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Chapter

Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v McNally [2013] EWCA Crim 1051, Court of Appeal. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

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Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Attorney-General’s Reference (No. 1 of 2022) [2020] EWCA Crim 1665, Court of Appeal. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

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Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v SD [2008] EWCA Crim 527, Court of Appeal. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

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Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v Bree [2007] EWCA Crim 804, Court of Appeal. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

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Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R (Monica) v DPP. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

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Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v SD [2008] EWCA Crim 527, Court of Appeal. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

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Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v Lawrance [2020] EWCA Crim 971, Court of Appeal. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v Bree [2007] EWCA Crim 804, Court of Appeal. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R (Monica) v DPP. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

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Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v Melin [2019] EWCA Crim 557, Court of Appeal. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

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Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v Barnes [2004] EWCA Crim 3246, Court of Appeal. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

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Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v B (MA) [2008] EWCA Crim 3, Court of Appeal. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

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Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v BM [2018] EWCA Crim 560, Court of Appeal. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

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This chapter discusses three key defences in the tort of negligence: voluntary assumption of risk (consent or volenti non fit injuria), contributory negligence and illegality. The defence of voluntary assumption of risk is based on the common-sense notion that ‘one who has invited or assented to an act being done towards him cannot, when he suffers it, complain of it as a wrong’. The defence of illegality denies recovery to certain claimants injured while committing unlawful activities. Contributory negligence is a defence that operates not to defeat the claimant’s claim entirely but rather to reduce the amount of damages the defendant must pay.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v B (MA) [2008] EWCA Crim 3, Court of Appeal. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v BM [2018] EWCA Crim 560, Court of Appeal. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v Barnes [2004] EWCA Crim 3246, Court of Appeal. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v Melin [2019] EWCA Crim 557, Court of Appeal. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

Chapter

This chapter discusses three key defences in the tort of negligence: voluntary assumption of risk (consent or volenti non fit injuria), contributory negligence and illegality. The defence of voluntary assumption of risk is based on the common-sense notion that ‘one who has invited or assented to an act being done towards him cannot, when he suffers it, complain of it as a wrong’. The defence of illegality denies recovery to certain claimants injured while committing unlawful activities. Contributory negligence is a defence that operates not to defeat the claimant’s claim entirely but rather to reduce the amount of damages the defendant must pay.

Chapter

All books in this flagship series contain carefully selected substantial extracts from key cases, legislation, and academic debate, providing students with a stand-alone resource. This chapter examines cases when a patient is unable to give consent to medical treatment, and considers: the consent requirement under criminal law and civil law; the form that consent should take; and the principle of autonomy. It discusses how the law treats patients who lack capacity or whose capacity is in doubt. It offers detailed analysis of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and recent Court of Protection decisions. It also covers cases involving the withdrawal of life-prolonging treatment from patients who lack capacity.