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Chapter

Cover Company Law

13. Membership  

This chapter discusses the concept of membership. Section 112 of the Companies Act 2006 (CA 2006) provides that a person is a member if they have agreed to become a member and their name is entered into the register of members. In relation to a newly created company, the subscribers to the company’s memorandum will become members, even if their names are not entered into the register of members. Accordingly, a person’s membership is terminated when their name is removed from the register of members. Every company must keep a register of its members, although private companies can elect to keep the required information on the central register maintained by Companies House. In order to help improve the transparency of company ownership, certain companies are required to keep a register of interests disclosed and a register of persons with significant control.

Chapter

Cover Mayson, French & Ryan on Company Law

Transparency  

This chapter discusses the obligations imposed on companies and their officers to provide information about the company, other than accounts. Information about a company’s constitution, membership, officers and finances must be provided to Companies House, which makes the information available for inspection by anyone at its website. Much of that information must also be made available for inspection at the company’s registered office or an alternative inspection place. Some other information, including directors’ service contracts, must be kept available for inspection by the company’s members at its registered office or inspection place. Any company must identify itself by its registered name at its registered office, inspection place, and places of business. Further identifying information, including its registered number, must be given on business letters, order forms and websites. The chapter discusses the general rules on disclosure and how they are enforced.

Chapter

Cover Mayson, French, and Ryan on Company Law

Transparency  

This chapter discusses the obligations imposed on companies and their officers to provide information about the company, other than accounts. Information about a company’s constitution, membership, officers and finances must be provided to Companies House, which makes the information available for inspection by anyone at its website. Much of that information must also be made available for inspection at the company’s registered office or an alternative inspection place. Some other information, including directors’ service contracts, must be kept available for inspection by the company’s members at its registered office or inspection place. Any company must identify itself by its registered name at its registered office, inspection place, and places of business. Further identifying information, including its registered number, must be given on business letters, order forms and websites. The chapter discusses the general rules on disclosure and how they are enforced.

Chapter

Cover Mayson, French & Ryan on Company Law

1. Overview  

This chapter provides an overview of the work’s contents. It introduces the basic ideas of company law. A company is an artificial legal person capable of owning property, being a party to contracts and being a claimant or defendant in legal proceedings. A company is created by registration at Companies House under the Companies Act 2006. A company is both an association of members (shareholders) and a person separate from its members. Members are not liable for the company’s debts. Members are only liable to make an agreed capital contribution in return for their shares. Members appoint directors to manage the company’s business and represent the company. Every company must have articles of association which set out the company’s constitution.

Chapter

Cover Mayson, French & Ryan on Company Law

3. Registration  

This chapter discusses the process of registration for the incorporation of companies under the Companies Act 2006. It considers the distinction between private and public companies, the meaning of limited liability and the significant characteristics of the company created by the registration procedure at Companies House, such as a company’s separate corporate personality (which is highly artificial), its members, shareholding, directors, secretary, name, constitution and its registered office and domicile. To deter misuse of companies, the registration process involves disclosing much information about a company which is then available for public inspection. This process of public disclosure continues throughout a company’s existence.

Chapter

Cover Mayson, French, and Ryan on Company Law

1. Overview  

This chapter provides an overview of the work’s contents. It introduces the basic ideas of company law. A company is an artificial legal person capable of owning property, being a party to contracts and being a claimant or defendant in legal proceedings. A company is created by registration at Companies House under the Companies Act 2006. A company is both an association of members (shareholders) and a person separate from its members. Members are not liable for the company’s debts. Members are only liable to make an agreed capital contribution in return for their shares. Members appoint directors to manage the company’s business and represent the company. Every company must have articles of association which set out the company’s constitution.

Chapter

Cover Mayson, French, and Ryan on Company Law

3. Registration  

This chapter discusses the process of registration for the incorporation of companies under the Companies Act 2006. It considers the distinction between private and public companies, the meaning of limited liability and the significant characteristics of the company created by the registration procedure at Companies House, such as a company’s separate corporate personality (which is highly artificial), its members, shareholding, directors, secretary, name, constitution and its registered office and domicile. To deter misuse of companies, the registration process involves disclosing much information about a company which is then available for public inspection. This process of public disclosure continues throughout a company’s existence.

Chapter

Cover Company Law

1. Formation, classification, and registration of companies  

This chapter considers the mechanics of formation and registration as well as the various types of companies which may be formed. The focus is on registered companies, registered under the Companies Act 2006. The chapter considers the role of the registrar of companies and the public registry and the types of companies which can be registered. The key categories are companies limited by shares and limited by guarantee. Private and public companies limited by shares as well as corporate groups are all considered. The chapter also looks briefly at alternative vehicles for business, such as partnerships, limited partnerships and limited liability partnerships.

Book

Cover Company Law Concentrate
Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. Concentrates show you what to expect in a law exam, what examiners are looking for, and how to achieve extra marks. Company Law Concentrate helps readers to consolidate knowledge in this area of law. This seventh edition has been fully updated and includes coverage of the Economic Crime and Corporate Transparency Bill/Act 2023, the Law Commission’s review of corporate criminal liability, and the Corporate Insolvency and Governance Act 2023. Case law updates include BTI 2014 LLV v Sequana SA [2022], Okpabi v Royal Dutch Shell plc [2021], Sevilleja v Marex Financial Ltd [2020], and WM Morrison Supermarkets plc v Various Claimants [2020]. Chapters examine business structures, incorporation, the constitution of the company, directors, members, corporate governance, capital and capital maintenance issues, members’ remedies, and corporate rescue and liquidation.

Chapter

Cover Introduction to Business Law

17. Company Law II  

Company Officers and Liabilities

This chapter discusses the rules relating to the officers of a company. It considers the meaning of ‘director’ and the position of the Board of Directors. It examines the appointment, retirement, and removal of directors and considers the powers of directors and their authority to act on behalf of the company. The chapter examines the general duties of directors, including the codified duties under the Companies Act 2006, and considers the effect of a breach of those duties. The appointment and the role of a company secretary and company auditors are examined. The chapter concludes with a discussion of the meaning of corporate governance.

Book

Cover Company Law Concentrate
Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. Concentrates show you what to expect in a law exam, what examiners are looking for, and how to achieve extra marks. Company Law Concentrate helps readers to consolidate knowledge in this area of law. This sixth edition has been fully updated and includes coverage of the 2018 UK Corporate Governance Code, the Wates Corporate Governance Principles, the UK Stewardship Code 2020, the Companies (Miscellaneous Reporting) Regulations 2018, and the reforms proposed following the consultation on insolvency and corporate governance. Case law updates include BAT Industries plc v Sequana SA [2019], Burnden Holdings (UK) Ltd v Fielding [2019], Popely v Popely [2019], and Vedanta Resources plc v Lungowe [2019]. Chapters examine business structures, incorporation, the constitution of the company, directors, members, corporate governance, capital and capital maintenance issues, members’ remedies, and corporate rescue and liquidation.

Chapter

Cover Sealy & Worthington's Text, Cases, and Materials in Company Law

1. The Company and its Incorporation  

This chapter discusses rescue and insolvency procedures. Companies experiencing financial difficulty have various options to effect either the timely rescue of viable commercial enterprises or the orderly and competent management of affairs before ceasing operations. This chapter considers: the Insolvency Act 1986 Pt 1A moratorium; company voluntary arrangements; administration; receivership and administrative receivership; distribution of assets subject to the receivership; liquidation or winding up; investigating and reporting the affairs of the company; dissolution of the company; and restoration to the register.

Chapter

Cover Card & James' Business Law

24. Corporate rescue, insolvency, and dissolution  

This chapter examines the different procedures available to companies that are experiencing financial difficulties. The chapter begins by examining what is a rescue culture, and the extent to which such a culture is present in the UK. The chapter then discusses a series of mechanisms that are designed to rescue a struggling company, namely administration and company voluntary arrangements. Receivership is then discussed, which is not a rescue procedure, but a mechanism designed to allow a creditor to recover monies owed. The chapter then looks at winding up (or liquidation) which is the process whereby the assets of the company are realized and paid out, prior to the company being dissolved. The chapter ends by looking at the rules relating to dissolution and restoration.

Chapter

Cover Mayson, French & Ryan on Company Law

14. Members  

This chapter focuses on the members or shareholders of a company and the way in which they take decisions on the company’s affairs. It begins by considering the rules which determine who is a member of a company and the information on the members which a company must record. It then describes the mandatory rules of company law that allow members to participate in decision-making with regard to a company’s affairs, members’ class rights and the alteration of such rights. Relevant provisions of the Companies Act 2006 governing written resolutions of private companies, meetings and annual general meetings, voting, adjournment of meetings and authorisation of political donations by companies are discussed. The chapter analyses a number of particularly significant cases.

Chapter

Cover Company Law

3. Incorporation  

This chapter examines the various ways by which a company can be created and the different types of company that can be created. The process of creating a company is known as ‘incorporation’. There are four principal methods of incorporating a company: by royal charter, by Act of Parliament, by delegated authority, or by registration. The general rule is that the Companies Act 2006 (CA 2006) only applies to registered companies. However, in order to prevent unregistered companies being under-regulated and having an unfair advantage over registered companies, the CA 2006 provides that the Secretary of State may pass regulations that set out how the CA 2006 is applied to unregistered companies. There are a number of different company types that can suit a wide array of businesses. These include public and private companies. Companies can change their status by a process called re-registration.

Chapter

Cover Company Law

1. Introduction to company law  

Titles in the Core Text series take the reader straight to the heart of the subject, providing focused, concise, and reliable guides for students at all levels. This chapter presents an overview of company law, first by considering the company’s place within the various forms of business organisation. To get some comparative perspective on the relative merits of each type of organisation, three criteria for judging them are discussed: whether the form of business organisation facilitates investment in the business, mitigates or minimises the risk involved in the business venture, and whether it provides a clear organisational structure. Using these criteria, three forms of business organisation are analysed: the sole trader, a partnership, or a registered company. The chapter also explains the importance of the memorandum as part of the company’s constitution, as well as the distinction between private companies and public companies. Finally, it outlines the benefits of forming a company as opposed to the sole trader or a partnership.

Chapter

Cover Mayson, French, and Ryan on Company Law

14. Members  

This chapter focuses on the members or shareholders of a company and the way in which they take decisions on the company’s affairs. It begins by considering the rules which determine who is a member of a company and the information on the members which a company must record. It then describes the mandatory rules of company law that allow members to participate in decision-making with regard to a company’s affairs, members’ class rights and the alteration of such rights. Relevant provisions of the Companies Act 2006 governing written resolutions of private companies, meetings and annual general meetings, voting, adjournment of meetings and authorisation of political donations by companies are discussed. The chapter analyses a number of particularly significant cases.

Chapter

Cover Mayson, French & Ryan on Company Law

D. Other legal forms for business  

This chapter discusses various general-purpose legal forms for carrying on business. It starts with the simplest form of all, sole proprietorship (or self-employment). Two or more persons carrying on a business or profession in common with a view of profit are in partnership, which has developed into the sophisticated form of the limited liability partnership. The rest of the chapter is devoted to the various lesser used forms of company which can be registered under the Companies Act 2006 (CA 2006). These are guarantee companies, unlimited companies and community interest companies. The chapter also discusses how re-registration can be used to transform various types of company into other types.

Chapter

Cover Mayson, French, and Ryan on Company Law

D. Other legal forms for business  

This chapter discusses various general-purpose legal forms for carrying on business. It starts with the simplest form of all, sole proprietorship (or self-employment). Two or more persons carrying on a business or profession in common with a view of profit are in partnership, which has developed into the sophisticated form of the limited liability partnership. The rest of the chapter is devoted to the various lesser used forms of company which can be registered under the Companies Act 2006 (CA 2006). These are guarantee companies, unlimited companies and community interest companies. The chapter also discusses how re-registration can be used to transform various types of company into other types.

Chapter

Cover Introduction to Business Law

16. Company Law I  

Formation and Finance

This chapter explains how companies limited by shares are formed and looks at the contents of companies’ constitutions. The discussions cover the role of promoters in setting up a company and the meaning of a company ‘off the shelf’. The chapter examines the steps and documentation necessary to register a new company limited by shares and the rules relating to a company’s name. It discusses the constitutional documents of a company and the rules relating to its constitution. The chapter concludes with a discussion of the financing of companies. It examines the different types of shares and the issuing of shares. It also considers debentures and charges.