1-20 of 219 Results

  • Keyword: company x
Clear all

Chapter

This chapter considers the mechanics of formation and registration and the various types of companies which may be formed. It also looks briefly at alternative vehicles for business. Companies are registered under the Companies Act 2006 and its predecessors. Once the formalities are completed, the registrar issues a certificate of incorporation. The remainder of the chapter covers types of registered companies, companies limited by guarantee, private and public companies, re-registration of companies, and groups of companies.

Chapter

This chapter discusses the concept of membership. Section 112 of the Companies Act 2006 (CA 2006) provides that a person is a member if they have agreed to become a member and their name is entered into the register of members. In relation to a newly created company, the subscribers to the company’s memorandum will become members, even if their names are not entered into the register of members. Accordingly, a person’s membership is terminated when their name is removed from the register of members. Every company must keep a register of its members, although private companies can elect to keep the required information on the central register maintained by Companies House. In order to help improve the transparency of company ownership, certain companies are required to keep a register of interests disclosed and a register of persons with significant control.

Chapter

This chapter considers the law relating to company officers. This is a combination of statute, common law, and regulations under a company’s articles of association. The discussions cover the division of powers within a company; appointment of directors, managing directors, alternate directors, and shadow directors; retirement of directors; removal of directors from office; powers of directors; directors’ duties; statutory controls on directors; the directors and protection of outsiders; and the company secretary.

Chapter

This chapter considers the law relating to company officers. This is a combination of statute, common law, and regulations under a company’s articles of association. The discussions cover the division of powers within a company; appointment of directors, managing directors, alternate directors, and shadow directors; retirement of directors; removal of directors from office; powers of directors; directors’ duties; statutory controls on directors; the directors and protection of outsiders; and the company secretary.

Chapter

This chapter discusses the obligations imposed on companies and their officers to provide information about the company, other than accounts. Information about a company’s constitution, membership, officers and finances must be provided to Companies House, which makes the information available for inspection by anyone at its website. Much of that information must also be made available for inspection at the company’s registered office or an alternative inspection place. Some other information, including directors’ service contracts, must be kept available for inspection by the company’s members at its registered office or inspection place. Any company must identify itself by its registered name at its registered office, inspection place, and places of business. Further identifying information, including its registered number, must be given on business letters, order forms and websites. The chapter discusses the general rules on disclosure and how they are enforced.

Chapter

This chapter discusses the process of registration for the incorporation of companies under the Companies Act 2006. It considers the distinction between private and public companies, the meaning of limited liability and the significant characteristics of the company created by the registration procedure (separate corporate personality, members, shareholding, directors, secretary, name, constitution and a registered office and domicile). The chapter discusses re-registration as a means of altering a company.

Chapter

This chapter provides an overview of the work’s contents. It introduces the basic ideas of company law. A company is an artificial legal person capable of owning property, being a party to contracts, and being a claimant or defendant in legal proceedings. A company is created by registration at Companies House under the Companies Act 2006. A company is both an association of members (shareholders) and a person separate from its members. Members are not liable for the company’s debts. Members are only liable to make an agreed capital contribution in return for their shares. Members appoint directors to manage the company’s business and represent the company. Every company must have articles of association which set out the company’s constitution.

Chapter

This chapter considers the mechanics of formation and registration as well as the various types of companies which may be formed. The focus is on registered companies, registered under the Companies Act 2006. The chapter considers the role of the registrar of companies and the public registry and the types of companies which can be registered. The key categories are companies limited by shares and limited by guarantee. Private and public companies limited by shares as well as corporate groups are all considered. The chapter also looks briefly at alternative vehicles for business, such as partnerships, limited partnerships and limited liability partnerships.

Chapter

This chapter provides an overview of the work’s contents. It introduces the basic ideas of company law. A company is an artificial legal person capable of owning property, being a party to contracts and being a claimant or defendant in legal proceedings. A company is created by registration at Companies House under the Companies Act 2006. A company is both an association of members (shareholders) and a person separate from its members. Members are not liable for the company’s debts. Members are only liable to make an agreed capital contribution in return for their shares. Members appoint directors to manage the company’s business and represent the company. Every company must have articles of association which set out the company’s constitution.

Chapter

This chapter discusses the process of registration for the incorporation of companies under the Companies Act 2006. It considers the distinction between private and public companies, the meaning of limited liability and the significant characteristics of the company created by the registration procedure at Companies House, such as a company’s separate corporate personality (which is highly artificial), its members, shareholding, directors, secretary, name, constitution and its registered office and domicile. To deter misuse of companies, the registration process involves disclosing much information about a company which is then available for public inspection. This process of public disclosure continues throughout a company’s existence.

Chapter

Lee Roach

This chapter discusses the concept of membership. Section 112 of the Companies Act 2006 (CA 2006) provides that a person is a member if they have agreed to become a member and their name is entered into the register of members. In relation to a newly created company, the subscribers to the company's memorandum will become members, even if their names are not entered into the register of members. Accordingly, a person's membership is terminated when his name is removed from the register of members. Every company must keep a register of its members, although private companies can elect to keep the required information on the central register maintained by Companies House. In order to help improve the transparency of company ownership, certain companies are required to keep a register of interests disclosed and a register of persons with significant control.

Chapter

This chapter begins with an overview of company law and the role of directors and members. It then discusses: the sources of company law (UK Companies Acts, case law, European law, human rights legislation, and self-regulation); the process of company law reform; the purpose of company law; classification of companies; companies and partnerships; and incorporation, registration, and the role of the registrar.

Chapter

Companies experiencing financial difficulty have various options to effect either the timely rescue of viable commercial enterprises or the orderly and competent management of affairs before ceasing operations. This chapter focuses on liquidations caused by insolvency. Topics include: company voluntary arrangements; administration; receivership and administrative receivership; distribution of assets subject to the receivership; liquidation or winding up; investigating and reporting the affairs of the company; dissolution of the company; and restoration to the register.

Chapter

This chapter considers the information about companies that is publicly available, paying particular attention to the rules with which the company must comply in relation to its accounts. It also provides some guidance on how to interpret the published accounts of a company.

Chapter

This chapter examines the different procedures available to companies that are experiencing financial difficulties. The chapter begins by examining what is a rescue culture, and the extent to which such a culture is present in the UK. The chapter then discusses a series of mechanisms that are designed to rescue a struggling company, namely administration and company voluntary arrangements. Receivership is then discussed, which is not a rescue procedure, but a mechanism designed to allow a creditor to recover monies owed. The chapter then looks at winding up (or liquidation) which is the process whereby the assets of the company are realized and paid out, prior to the company being dissolved. The chapter ends by looking at the rules relating to dissolution and restoration.

Chapter

This chapter considers the information about companies that is publicly available, paying particular attention to the rules with which the company must comply in relation to its accounts. It also provides some guidance on how to interpret the published accounts of a company.

Chapter

This chapter discusses rescue and insolvency procedures. Companies experiencing financial difficulty have various options to effect either the timely rescue of viable commercial enterprises or the orderly and competent management of affairs before ceasing operations. This chapter considers: the Insolvency Act 1986 Pt 1A moratorium; company voluntary arrangements; administration; receivership and administrative receivership; distribution of assets subject to the receivership; liquidation or winding up; investigating and reporting the affairs of the company; dissolution of the company; and restoration to the register.

Chapter

17. Company Law II  

Company Officers and Liabilities

This chapter discusses the rules relating to the officers of a company. It considers the meaning of ‘director’ and the position of the Board of Directors. It examines the appointment, retirement, and removal of directors and considers the powers of directors and their authority to act on behalf of the company. The chapter examines the general duties of directors, including the codified duties under the Companies Act 2006, and considers the effect of a breach of those duties. The appointment and the role of a company secretary and company auditors are examined. The chapter concludes with a discussion of the meaning of corporate governance.

Book

Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. Concentrates show you what to expect in a law exam, what examiners are looking for, and how to achieve extra marks. Company Law Concentrate helps readers to consolidate knowledge in this area of law. This sixth edition has been fully updated and includes coverage of the 2018 UK Corporate Governance Code, the Wates Corporate Governance Principles, the UK Stewardship Code 2020, the Companies (Miscellaneous Reporting) Regulations 2018, and the reforms proposed following the consultation on insolvency and corporate governance. Case law updates include BAT Industries plc v Sequana SA [2019], Burnden Holdings (UK) Ltd v Fielding [2019], Popely v Popely [2019], and Vedanta Resources plc v Lungowe [2019]. Chapters examine business structures, incorporation, the constitution of the company, directors, members, corporate governance, capital and capital maintenance issues, members’ remedies, and corporate rescue and liquidation.

Chapter

This chapter considers the process by which a limited company is formed and the steps required both for and following its formation. It also looks at the related changes which can be made to a company’s main features. The process of registering a company is governed by the Companies Act 2006.