1-3 of 3 Results

  • Keyword: cohabitants x
Clear all

Chapter

Cover Family Law

5. Cohabitants and Remedies Not Dependent on Marriage  

Marriage is not the only way that couples can live together. The term for living together without marriage or civil partnership is cohabiting. The numbers for people cohabiting rather than living in marriage or civil partnership is increasing. The acceptance of cohabitation across all age groups has risen also. Irrespective of the nature and duration of the cohabitation, there exist in the law a vast difference between the position of cohabitants and those of married couples when a relationship breaks down and in terms of law and legal rights. This chapter looks at what the differences are and what remedies are available to cohabiting partners who suffer a relationship breakdown. Unfortunately, the government appears to have no plans to reform this area of law.

Chapter

Cover Family Law

2. Family Relationships Between Adults  

All books in this flagship series contain carefully selected substantial extracts from key cases, legislation, and academic debate, providing able students with a stand-alone resource. This chapter first considers demographic data on family relationships in England and Wales, and then examines the treatment of ‘trans’ people in this area of family law; and the history of legal recognition of intimate relationships between parties of the same gender, culminating in same-sex marriage and ensuing debates about the future of civil partnership. This is then followed by discussions of status-based relationships (marriage and civil partnership); creating a valid marriage or civil partnership; grounds on which a marriage or civil partnership is void; grounds on which a marriage or civil partnership is voidable; and non-formalized relationships (cohabitants and other ‘family’).

Chapter

Cover Family Law

2. Family Relationships Between Adults  

All books in this flagship series contain carefully selected substantial extracts from key cases, legislation, and academic debate, providing able students with a stand-alone resource. This chapter first considers demographic data on family relationships in England and Wales, and then examines the treatment of ‘trans’ people in this area of family law; and the history of legal recognition of intimate relationships between parties of the same gender, culminating in the introduction of same-sex marriage and mixed-sex civil partnership. This is then followed by discussions of status-based relationships (marriage and civil partnership); creating a valid marriage or civil partnership; grounds on which a marriage or civil partnership is void; grounds on which a marriage or civil partnership is voidable; and non-formalized relationships (cohabitants and other ‘family’).