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Chapter

Cover Family Law Concentrate

2. Nullity  

Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. Concentrates show you what to expect in a law exam, what examiners are looking for, and how to achieve extra marks. This chapter, which focuses on nullity as a way of terminating marriage or civil partnership, first explains the difference between nullity and divorce on one hand, and between a void marriage and a non-marriage on the other. It then considers the grounds on which a marriage may be void and voidable in England and Wales under the Matrimonial Causes Act 1973, as well the grounds on which a civil partnership may be void and voidable under the Civil Partnership Act 2004. The chapter concludes with an assessment of the future of nullity.

Chapter

Cover Family Law Concentrate

5. Financial provision on divorce or dissolution  

Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. Concentrates show you what to expect in a law exam, what examiners are looking for, and how to achieve extra marks. This chapter discusses financial provision on divorce or dissolution of marriage or civil partnership, including housing and everyday expenses of the parties and any children involved. It considers the courts’ statutory powers to redistribute property in case of divorce, nullity, judicial separation, or the dissolution of a civil partnership. The chapter explains how civil partners in England and Wales are treated under the Civil Partnership Act 2004 (CPA) and the courts’ application of the provisions of the Matrimonial Causes Act 1973 (MCA) in reaching a decision in divorce cases. It also discusses the three principles of financial needs, compensation, and sharing used by the courts in making an award; nuptial agreements; the Law Commission Report on Matrimonial Property, Needs and Agreements; and provision for children under the MCA, the CPA, the Child Support Act 1991, and the Children Act 1989.

Book

Cover Family Law

Edited by Ruth Lamont

Family Law offers a contextual and critical examination of the subject, discussing areas of debate and controversy. Topics include: family life and the law; marriage, civil partnership, and cohabitation; seeking a divorce; and property division on divorce. It also examines property division on the breakdown of non-marital relationships; child support; domestic violence and abuse; and legal parenthood and parental responsibility. It moves on to look at private child law, public law child protection, adoption; and human rights and children’s rights in the family. Finally, it considers international family law and family law in practice.

Chapter

Cover Family Law

2. Relationships between Adults: Marriage, Civil Partnership, and Cohabitation  

Andy Hayward

This chapter explores the historical development and modern statutory framework applicable to adult formalised and non-formalised relationships. It attempts to instil a thorough understanding of the key principles applicable to the formation and subsequent regulation of these relationships. Owing to the rapid change in family forms and the growing legal recognition of same-sex relationships, the statutory framework has evolved. The chapter assesses how far these frameworks have successfully accommodated modern family forms and whether further reform is required. Topics discussed include the evolution of marriage; the formal recognition of same-sex relationships; legal consequences and formalities for entry into marriage; the legal consequences of nullity; civil partnerships; and cohabitation.

Chapter

Cover Family Law

2. Marriage and Civil Partnership  

This chapter starts by considering how people get married, tracing the institution of marriage through history. It looks at the evolving popularity of marriage to the present day. The chapter then addresses the social and legal significance of marriage. It asks: Why does the state encourage people to marry? The chapter also looks at other ways in which relationships can be formalised under the law. Finally, the chapter turns to civil partnerships and looks at the changes in legal status to such partnerships over time. It also considers public perceptions of civil partnerships. Finally the chapter asks: Is there a future for marriage?

Chapter

Cover Family Law Concentrate

1. Family relationships, marriage, civil partnership, cohabitation  

Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. Concentrates show you what to expect in an exam, what examiners are looking for, and how to achieve extra marks. This chapter focuses on family relationships, marriage, same sex marriage, civil partnership, forced marriage, and cohabitation, beginning with a discussion of the absence of a widely acceptable definition regarding the concept of ‘family’. It examines how marriage was defined in Hyde v Hyde (1866), and the definition of civil partnership under the Civil Partnership Act 2004. The concept of ‘common law marriage’ and the rights of those cohabiting is considered, along with the importance of formalities to end marriage and civil partnership. It also highlights the rights of parties to a marriage or civil partnership to acquire rights over property during the relationship on the basis of trusts law or proprietary estoppel. Finally, it looks at calls to reform the law in relation to cohabitants, particularly with regard to joint ownership of property.

Chapter

Cover Bromley's Family Law

2. Forming Intimate Enduring Adult Relationships  

N V Lowe, G Douglas, E Hitchings, and R Taylor

This chapter begins with a discussion of marriage as a legal concept, the legal recognition of same-sex relationships and creation of civil partnerships. It considers the rules governing entry into marriage and civil partnership and the presumption of marriage. It also discusses the concept of nullity of marriage or civil partnership, the concept of a ‘non-qualifying ceremony’ and the grounds for annulment. The chapter concludes with a discussion of cohabitation outside marriage and its recognition by the law.

Chapter

Cover Hayes & Williams' Family Law

1. The formation of adult relationships  

This chapter examines the law surrounding the formation of the formal relationships of marriage and civil partnership, including the law on nullity. It also explores, by way of contrast, non-formal cohabiting relationships. Topics discussed include void and voidable marriages, sham marriages, forced marriages; the development of gay and lesbian rights; the road to same-sex marriage and the extension of civil partnership to opposite-sex couples; and the legal consequences of marriage.

Book

Cover Concentrate Questions and Answers Family Law
The Concentrate Questions and Answers series offers the best preparation for tackling exam and assignment questions. Each book includes key debates, typical questions, diagram answer plans, suggested answers, author commentary, and tips to gain extra marks. Concentrate Q&A Family Law offers expert advice on what to expect from your family law exam, how best to prepare, and guidance on what examiners are really looking for. Written by an experienced examiner, it provides: clear commentary with each question and answer; diagram answer plans; tips to make your answer really stand out from the crowd; and further reading suggestions at the end of every chapter. The book should help you to: identify typical family law exam questions; structure a good answer; avoid common mistakes; show the examiner what you know; make your answer stand out; and find relevant further reading. After an introduction on exam skills for success in family law, chapters cover: marriage, civil partnerships, and cohabitation; void, voidable and non-marriage; divorce and judicial separation; domestic abuse; family property; financial remedies and child support; parenthood and parental responsibility; children’s rights and private law; international relocation and abduction; public law and adoption; mixed topic questions and skills for success in coursework assessments.

Chapter

Cover Family Law

4. Financial Provision on Divorce  

One of the main issues that the parties need to consider when a marriage or civil partnership ends is the financial consequences of the divorce, dissolution, or judicial separation. Amongst other things, they need to consider where they are going to live and what money they need to live on in the future. Their current assets will need to be evaluated and divided accordingly. The parties do not always agree on how to do this. Whatever they decide, the court has to approve of the decision. The chapter looks at the courts' powers, the legal principles they apply, the practical implications, and the problems that may arise in financial remedy practice. A number of different scenarios are used to help with this analysis.

Book

Cover Family Law Concentrate
Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. Concentrates show you what to expect in a law exam, what examiners are looking for, and how to achieve extra marks. Family Law Concentrate is supported by extensive online resources to take your learning further. It has been written by experts and covers all the key topics so that you can approach your exams with confidence. The clear, succinct coverage enables you to quickly grasp the fundamental principles of this area of law and helps you to succeed in exams. This guide has been rigorously reviewed and is endorsed by students and lecturers for level of coverage, accuracy, and exam advice. It is clear, concise, and easy to use, helping you get the most out of your revision. After an introduction, the book covers: families, civil partnerships, and cohabitation; nullity; divorce, dissolution, and judicial separation; domestic abuse; financial provision on divorce or dissolution; Children—private law; Children—public law; adoption; and child abduction. This, the fifth edition, has been fully updated in light of recent developments in the law, including the extension of civil partnerships to heterosexual couples, the Law Commission reviews of the law of surrogacy and marriage and proposals to reform the law of divorce and domestic abuse.

Chapter

Cover Family Law Concentrate

3. Divorce, dissolution, and judicial separation  

Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. Concentrates show you what to expect in a law exam, what examiners are looking for, and how to achieve extra marks. This chapter focuses on divorce, dissolution, and judicial separation as means of ending marriage or civil partnership. It first considers the grounds for divorce/dissolution and highlights five facts that can be used to prove a marriage has irretrievably broken down: adultery, behaviour, desertion, two years’ separation with consent, and five years’ separation. The chapter then compares no-fault divorce with divorce based on fault and provides an overview of the debates surrounding reform. Finally, it considers alternatives to the court process when dealing with divorce, dissolution, and judicial separation, with a particular focus on mediation.

Chapter

Cover Family Law

2. Family Relationships Between Adults  

All books in this flagship series contain carefully selected substantial extracts from key cases, legislation, and academic debate, providing able students with a stand-alone resource. This chapter first considers demographic data on family relationships in England and Wales, and then examines the treatment of ‘trans’ people in this area of family law; and the history of legal recognition of intimate relationships between parties of the same gender, culminating in same-sex marriage and ensuing debates about the future of civil partnership. This is then followed by discussions of status-based relationships (marriage and civil partnership); creating a valid marriage or civil partnership; grounds on which a marriage or civil partnership is void; grounds on which a marriage or civil partnership is voidable; and non-formalized relationships (cohabitants and other ‘family’).

Chapter

Cover Family Law

3. Ending Relationships: Divorce and Separation  

All books in this flagship series contain carefully selected substantial extracts from key cases, legislation, and academic debate, providing able students with a stand-alone resource. This chapter discusses the law on divorce and separation. It covers divorces in England and Wales; the nature, function, and limits of divorce law; a brief history of divorce law to 1969; the present law of divorce and judicial separation; evaluation of the current law; options for reform of divorce law and the process of divorce; and the future of English divorce law.

Chapter

Cover Hayes & Williams' Family Law

2. The dissolution of adult relationships  

This chapter addresses the termination of adult relationships, in particular divorce, but also the dissolution of civil partnerships, and the termination of cohabitation. Beginning with a discussion of the history of law on divorce and recent divorce statistics, it goes on to cover the law of divorce under the Matrimonial Causes Act (MCA) 1973, criticisms of the current law and recent reform initiatives. It then considers other decrees under MCA 1973, dissolution of a civil partnership, and termination of unmarried relationships.

Chapter

Cover Bromley's Family Law

8. Financial Remedies: The Court’s Powers  

N V Lowe, G Douglas, E Hitchings, and R Taylor

This chapter discusses the law governing financial remedies in the context of a divorce, dissolution of a civil partnership, nullity and separation. It deals with the court’s powers and the procedures under which these are exercised.

Chapter

Cover Card & James' Business Law

19. Incorporation and bodies corporate  

This chapter examines the law governing incorporation and bodies corporate. It explains that corporate bodies are called such because they are created via the process of incorporation and have corporate personality (and are therefore legal persons), and these types of business entities come in two principal forms, namely companies and limited liability partnerships. It discusses the formation and registration process for these types of businesses and the different types of registered companies. This chapter also describes the advantages of incorporation which include corporate personality, limited liability, and perpetual succession and its disadvantages which include civil liability, criminal liability, and potentially complex regulation.

Chapter

Cover Family Law

2. Family Relationships Between Adults  

All books in this flagship series contain carefully selected substantial extracts from key cases, legislation, and academic debate, providing able students with a stand-alone resource. This chapter first considers demographic data on family relationships in England and Wales, and then examines the treatment of ‘trans’ people in this area of family law; and the history of legal recognition of intimate relationships between parties of the same gender, culminating in the introduction of same-sex marriage and mixed-sex civil partnership. This is then followed by discussions of status-based relationships (marriage and civil partnership); creating a valid marriage or civil partnership; grounds on which a marriage or civil partnership is void; grounds on which a marriage or civil partnership is voidable; and non-formalized relationships (cohabitants and other ‘family’).

Chapter

Cover Concentrate Questions and Answers Family Law

2. The Formation and Recognition of Adult Relationships: Marriage, Civil Partnerships, and Cohabitation  

The Concentrate Questions and Answers series offers the best preparation for tackling exam and assignment questions. Each book includes key debates, typical questions, diagram answer plans, suggested answers, author commentary, and tips to gain extra marks. This chapter considers the formation and recognition of adult relationships, i.e. marriage, same-sex marriage, civil partnerships, and cohabitation. The questions included in this chapter cover: the right to marry contained in article 12 of the European Convention on Human Rights; forced marriage; the difference between opposite-sex marriage, same-sex marriage, and civil partnerships, and the difference between marriage and cohabitation.

Chapter

Cover Family Law

6. Financial Support for Children  

It is undeniable that anyone who is legally classified as a parent has an obligation to maintain their child. This chapter considers three areas of financial support for children: child maintenance as a percentage of gross weekly income of the non-resident parent, the financial outcomes of divorce as guided by the Matrimonial Causes Act 1973 or the Civil Partnership Act 2004, and Schedule 1 of the Children Act 1989. The chapter starts with a brief history of financial support for children in the UK.