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Cover Essential Cases: Criminal Law

R v Coley [2013] EWCA Crim 223, Court of Appeal  

Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v Coley [2013] EWCA Crim 223, Court of Appeal. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

Chapter

Cover Essential Cases: Criminal Law

R v Coley [2013] EWCA Crim 223, Court of Appeal  

Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v Coley [2013] EWCA Crim 223, Court of Appeal. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

Chapter

Cover The Oxford Handbook of Criminology

31. Drugs: consumption, addiction, and treatment  

Toby Seddon

The issue of illicit drugs is one of the most difficult and intractable problems we face today. It spans across the globe and is connected with a range of serious issues, including public health, crime, security, inequalities, and development. This chapter explores three key dimensions of the drug problem, in order to provide a critical account, informed by history and theory. First, the human attraction to intoxicating substances is examined and patterns of consumption are described. Second, understandings of why some people develop problems from habitual consumption are examined, exploring in particular the concept of addiction. Third, it explores the different ways in which societies have attempted to help people experiencing drug-related problems through different methods and modes of drug treatment.

Chapter

Cover The Oxford Handbook of Criminology

36. Principles, pragmatism, and prohibition: explaining continuity and change in british drug policy  

Alex Stevens

This chapter analyses the development of British policy on illicit drugs from the late nineteenth century until 2016. It shows how this is characterized by contestation between social groups who have an interest in the control and regulation of some drugs and their users. It argues that there is a ‘medico-penal constellation’ of powerful organizations that produce British drug policy in accordance with their own ideas and interest. There have been clashes between the different principles held by people within these organizations but these have often been dealt with through the creation of pragmatic compromises. Recent examples include policies towards ‘recovery’ in drug treatment and new psychoactive substances whilst heroin-related deaths are used to explain why, so far, these pragmatic compromises have not ended the prohibition upon which British drug policy is based.