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Chapter

Cover Essential Cases: Criminal Law

R v Hasan [2005] UKHL 22, House of Lords  

Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v Hasan [2005] UKHL 22, House of Lords. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

Chapter

Cover Essential Cases: Criminal Law

R v Hasan [2005] UKHL 22, House of Lords  

Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v Hasan [2005] UKHL 22, House of Lords. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

Chapter

Cover Essential Cases: Criminal Law

R v Collins [1973] QB 100, Court of Appeal  

Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v Collins [1973] QB 100, Court of Appeal. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

Chapter

Cover Essential Cases: Criminal Law

R v Collins [1973] QB 100, Court of Appeal  

Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v Collins [1973] QB 100, Court of Appeal. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

Chapter

Cover Criminal Law Directions

10. Other offences against property  

Without assuming prior legal knowledge, books in the Directions series introduce and guide readers through key points of law and legal debate. Questions, diagrams, and exercises help readers to engage fully with each subject and check their understanding as they progress. This chapter explores other offences against property such as robbery, burglary, aggravated burglary, blackmail, handling stolen goods, and criminal damage. The first four of these offences are found in the Theft Act 1968 and criminal damage is found in the Criminal Damage Act 1971. While these offences primarily seek to protect property or economic interests, some also provide protection to the well-being of the individual.

Chapter

Cover Concentrate Q&A Criminal Law

6. Property Offences  

The Concentrate Questions and Answers series offers the best preparation for tackling exam questions. Each book includes typical questions, diagram answer plans, suggested answers, author commentary and advice on study skills. This chapter presents sample exam questions on theft, fraud, and other property offences such as robbery and burglary, along with suggested answers. The law of property is vast, and contained in a number of different pieces of legislation. As this chapter explains, the Fraud Act 2006 was designed to replace many of the discrepancies and inconsistencies in the diverse provisions of the Theft Acts of 1968 and 1978. It pays to be methodical in approaching property problems. Dishonesty is an important concept throughout the property offences. The recent decision in Ivey v Genting Casinos, which has an important effect on the definition of dishonesty in criminal law, is dealt with in detail in this chapter.

Chapter

Cover Criminal Law

10. Burglary and Blackmail  

This chapter discusses the law and theory on burglary and blackmail. The offence of burglary is committed where a defendant enters a building as a trespasser with intent to commit one of the offences listed in section 9 of the Theft Act 1968. It is also committed where a defendant has entered a building as a trespasser and then committed one of a list of other offences. To be guilty of blackmail, a defendant must make unwarranted demands with menaces with a view to making a gain for themselves or a loss to another.

Chapter

Cover Smith, Hogan, and Ormerod's Criminal Law

25. Burglary and related offences  

David Ormerod and Karl Laird

Burglary is an offence under the Theft Act 1968. The offence is not confined to ‘breaking and entering’ in order to steal, but involves entering any building or part of a building as a trespasser and with intent to steal anything in the building or inflict or attempt to inflict on any person therein any grievous bodily harm. A separate form of burglary is found in s 9(1)(b) of the Theft Act 1968 where a person has entered as a trespasser and thereafter attempted to steal, actually stole something, inflicted grievous bodily harm or attempted to inflict grievous bodily harm. This chapter looks at burglary and related offences and also discusses aggravated burglary and the articles of aggravation, as well as trespass with intent to commit a sexual offence.

Chapter

Cover Complete Criminal Law

10. Property offences 1: theft, robbery, burglary, and handling  

This chapter examines property offences in England and Wales, focusing on theft, burglary, robbery, and handling. The chapter outlines the general principles of these offences and discusses their actus reus and mens rea elements. It looks at the key provisions of the Theft Act 1968 including the s1 definition of theft in the Act and analyses the bases of court decisions in several examples of relevant cases. It discusses property and appropriation. It also discusses recent changes to the definition of dishonesty and how juries are now asked to assess dishonesty after the civil case of Ivey v Genting Casinos (UK) Ltd (Crockfords).

Chapter

Cover Ashworth's Principles of Criminal Law

10. Property Offences  

This chapter discusses property offences. These include theft, taking a conveyance without consent, robbery, blackmail, burglary, handling stolen goods, and criminal damage. Among these, the offence receiving the most detailed treatment is theft. The current definition of theft dates back to 1968, long before the time when it became possible to hold and transfer money and other items (such as photographs) electronically, and the courts have sought to interpret the law in such a way that it can meet this challenge. But, in seeking to modernize the law’s approach to new forms of property holding and transfer, has the definition become too wide?

Chapter

Cover Smith, Hogan and Ormerod's Essentials of Criminal Law

9. Theft and other property offences  

David Ormerod and John Child

This chapter deals with offences against property, a category of offences that criminalise conduct such as the dishonest taking of another’s property (e.g. theft, robbery), possessing stolen or criminal property (e.g. handling stolen goods, money laundering), and damaging another’s property (e.g. criminal damage, arson). Beyond such crimes, there are also a number of specific technical offences designed to protect particular property rights, such as those relating to vehicle misuse and intellectual and/or digital property. The final sections of the chapter outline potential options for legal reform and the application of property offences within problem questions. Relevant cases are highlighted throughout the chapter, with brief summaries of the main facts and judgments.

Chapter

Cover Criminal Law

14. Further offences under the Theft Acts  

Michael J. Allen and Ian Edwards

Course-focused and contextual, Criminal Law provides a succinct overview of the key areas on the law curriculum balanced with thought-provoking contextual discussion. This chapter discusses the several offences in the Theft Acts 1968 and 1978, including: making off without payment; burglary (including discussion of the key terms ‘entry as a trespasser’, ‘building’, and the ulterior offences); aggravated burglary (burglary committed when the person has with them a firearm or imitation firearm, or offensive weapon); blackmail; handling stolen goods; and dishonestly retaining a wrongful credit. The feature ‘The law in context’ feature examines how burglars are sentenced, including the applicable sentencing guidelines, the evolution of relevant case law, and the ‘three strikes and you’re out’ mandatory sentence.

Chapter

Cover Smith, Hogan, and Ormerod's Essentials of Criminal Law

9. Theft and other property offences  

This chapter deals with offences against property, a category of offences that criminalise conduct such as the dishonest taking of another’s property (eg theft, robbery), possessing stolen or criminal property (eg handling stolen goods, money laundering), and damaging another’s property (eg criminal damage, arson). Beyond such crimes, there are also a number of specific technical offences designed to protect particular property rights, such as those relating to vehicle misuse and intellectual and/or digital property. The final sections of the chapter outline potential options for legal reform and the application of property offences within problem questions. Relevant cases are highlighted throughout the chapter, with brief summaries of the main facts and judgments.

Chapter

Cover Criminal Law Concentrate

13. Other property offences  

Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. Concentrates show you what to expect in a law exam, what examiners are looking for, and how to achieve extra marks. This chapter examines six offences: criminal damage, robbery, burglary, handling stolen goods, making off without payment, and squatting. What the offences share is that they relate in some way to property. Although rarely examined on their own, these topics are often assessed as part of bigger questions, sometimes incorporating other offences (eg theft, assault) and sometimes involving aspects of the general defences too.