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Chapter

Cover Casebook on Tort Law

12. Breach of statutory duty  

This chapter discusses liability for breach of statutory duty. There may be cases where a statute renders a certain activity a crime, and the law imposes an additional civil liability towards a person harmed by the act. While some statutes state this directly, most statutes make no mention of potential civil liability, but nevertheless liability may be imposed if the court believes that Parliament impliedly intended there to be a remedy. Not only are there difficulties about when a civil duty will be spelt out of a criminal or regulatory statute, but there are also problems about the role and function of the tort of statutory duty.

Chapter

Cover Essential Cases: Equity & Trusts

Bristol and West Building Society v Mothew [1998] Ch 1, Court of Appeal  

Essential Cases: Equity & Trusts provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Bristol and West Building Society v Mothew [1998] Ch 1, Court of Appeal. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Derek Whayman.

Chapter

Cover Essential Cases: Equity & Trusts

Bristol and West Building Society v Mothew [1998] Ch 1, Court of Appeal  

Essential Cases: Equity & Trusts provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Bristol and West Building Society v Mothew [1998] Ch 1, Court of Appeal. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Derek Whayman.

Chapter

Cover An Introduction to Tort Law

3. Breach of Duty  

Celebrated for their conceptual clarity, titles in the Clarendon Law Series offer concise, accessible overviews of major fields of law and legal thought. This chapter discusses breach of duty. To establish breach of duty, it must be determined that there was some misbehaviour by the defendant himself. The chapter addresses the question of whether the defendant behaved reasonably. It considers factors such as foreseeability of harm objective standard, normal practice, utility of conduct, cost of prevention, conduct of others, and emergencies. It then turns to the identification of the breach.

Chapter

Cover Tort Law

2. Introduction to the tort of negligence  

The chapter begins by mapping and explaining the historical development of the tort of negligence, and some of the key themes underpinning the tort, before placing the discussion in the context of the modern law of negligence. The chapter then outlines the essential ingredients of a claim in negligence—a duty of care, a breach of that duty and the damage caused by that breach—before going on to explore these in practice through a close examination of the first instance judgment in X & Y v London Borough of Hounslow [2008].

Chapter

Cover Tort Law

8. Breach of duty: the standard of care  

This chapter focuses on breach of duty. Breach occurs where a defendant has fallen below the particular standard of care demanded by the law. This is largely an objective test and is determined by comparing the actions of the defendant to those imagined to be done in the same circumstances by the so-called ‘reasonable man’. The questions to be answered are how the defendant ought to have behaved (what was the required standard of care) and how the defendant did behave (did they in fact fall below that standard).

Chapter

Cover Tort Law

2. Introduction to the tort of negligence  

The chapter begins by mapping and explaining the historical development of the tort of negligence, and some of the key themes underpinning the tort, before placing the discussion in the context of the modern law of negligence. The chapter then outlines the essential ingredients of a claim in negligence—a duty of care, a breach of that duty and the damage caused by that breach—before going on to explore these in practice through a close examination of the first instance judgment in X & Y v London Borough of Hounslow [2008].

Chapter

Cover Tort Law

8. Breach of duty: the standard of care  

This chapter focuses on the second of the requirements necessary to establish a claim in the tort of negligence—breach of duty. Breach occurs where a defendant has fallen below the particular standard of care demanded by the law. This is largely an objective test and is determined by comparing the actions of the defendant to those imagined to be done in the same circumstances by the so-called ‘reasonable man’. The questions to be answered are how the defendant ought to have behaved (what was the required standard of care) and how the defendant did behave (did they in fact fall below that standard).

Chapter

Cover Essential Cases: Tort Law

Dunnage v Randall [2016] QB 639  

Essential Cases: Tort Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Dunnage v Randall [2016] QB 639. The document also included supporting commentary from author Craig Purshouse.

Chapter

Cover Essential Cases: Tort Law

Dunnage v Randall [2016] QB 639  

Essential Cases: Tort Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Dunnage v Randall [2016] QB 639. The document also included supporting commentary from author Craig Purshouse.

Chapter

Cover Essential Cases: Equity & Trusts

Tang Man Sit v Capacious Investments [1996] AC 514, Privy Council  

Essential Cases: Equity & Trusts provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Tang Man Sit v Capacious Investments [1996] AC 514, Privy Council. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Derek Whayman.

Chapter

Cover Essential Cases: Equity & Trusts

Tang Man Sit v Capacious Investments [1996] AC 514, Privy Council  

Essential Cases: Equity & Trusts provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Tang Man Sit v Capacious Investments [1996] AC 514, Privy Council. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Derek Whayman.

Chapter

Cover Essential Cases: Equity & Trusts

Boardman v Phipps [1967] 2 AC 46, House of Lords  

Essential Cases: Equity & Trusts provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Boardman v Phipps [1967] 2 AC 46, House of Lords. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Derek Whayman.

Chapter

Cover Essential Cases: Equity & Trusts

Boardman v Phipps [1967] 2 AC 46, House of Lords  

Essential Cases: Equity & Trusts provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Boardman v Phipps [1967] 2 AC 46, House of Lords. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Derek Whayman.

Chapter

Cover Card & James' Business Law

13. An introduction to the law of torts  

This chapter provides an introduction to the law of torts. It explains that the objectives of tort law are to compensate those who suffer harm, to deter conduct that causes harm, and to protect legitimate interests. Tort law, along with contract law, forms the backbone of Britain’s civil justice system and is of immense importance to the business community because it represents a significant source of legal exposure for businesses. The chapter provides an introduction to the concept of the duty of care, as well as discussing who can sue and be sued in the event of a breach of duty. Finally, the chapter discusses how the law of torts has been affected by the European Convention on Human Rights.

Chapter

Cover Essential Cases: Equity & Trusts

Bank of Credit and Commerce International (Overseas) Ltd v Akindele [2001] Ch 437, Court of Appeal  

Essential Cases: Equity & Trusts provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Bank of Credit and Commerce International (Overseas) Ltd v Akindele [2001] Ch 437, Court of Appeal. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Derek Whayman.

Chapter

Cover Essential Cases: Equity & Trusts

Foskett v McKeown [2001] 1 AC 102, House of Lords  

Essential Cases: Equity & Trusts provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Foskett v McKeown [2001] 1 AC 102, House of Lords. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Derek Whayman.

Chapter

Cover Essential Cases: Equity & Trusts

Bank of Credit and Commerce International (Overseas) Ltd v Akindele [2001] Ch 437, Court of Appeal  

Essential Cases: Equity & Trusts provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Bank of Credit and Commerce International (Overseas) Ltd v Akindele [2001] Ch 437, Court of Appeal. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Derek Whayman.

Chapter

Cover Essential Cases: Equity & Trusts

Foskett v McKeown [2001] 1 AC 102, House of Lords  

Essential Cases: Equity & Trusts provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Foskett v McKeown [2001] 1 AC 102, House of Lords. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Derek Whayman.

Chapter

Cover Pearce & Stevens' Trusts and Equitable Obligations

36. Limitation of action  

This chapter considers the defence of limitation in regard to an action for compensation for breach of trust, which are governed by the Limitation Act 1980. Actions normally have to be brought within a six-year limitation period, though there are exceptions such as fraud, where no limitation period is imposed. The related doctrine of laches (unreasonable delay) is also explored. It also considers those provisions as they apply to actions against fiduciaries who have received an unauthorized profit, which has proved more difficult because the legislation does not make any express provision for such claims. A failed attempt at legislative reform of the operation of limitation periods by the Law Commission is also explored.