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Chapter

This chapter considers the remedies available to a seller if the buyer fails to pay for the goods pursuant to a contract of sale. It should be noted at the outset that the term ‘seller’ also includes ‘any person who is in the position of a seller, such as an agent of the seller to whom a bill of lading has been indorsed, or a consignor or agent who has himself paid (or is directly responsible for) the price’. This is of particular assistance to an agent who, having paid the price to the seller with the intention of recovering the money from the buyer, will have the same protection afforded to unpaid sellers as if he or she were the seller directly.

Chapter

This chapter considers the remedies available to a seller if the buyer fails to pay for the goods pursuant to a contract of sale. It should be noted at the outset that the term ‘seller’ also includes ‘any person who is in the position of a seller, such as an agent of the seller to whom a bill of lading has been indorsed, or a consignor or agent who has himself paid (or is directly responsible for) the price’. This is of particular assistance to an agent who, having paid the price to the seller with the intention of recovering the money from the buyer, will have the same protection afforded to unpaid sellers as if he or she were the seller directly.

Chapter

This chapter identifies what amounts to an international sale, discusses the ways in which the nature of the law of international sales of goods differs from domestic sales, and explores how documents are used to deal with some of the legal risks associated with contracts involving international deliveries. It then looks at a typical international sale in outline, before focusing in detail on how the bill of lading, perhaps the most characteristic document used in international sales, operates. In a documentary sale, the mechanics of the completion of the sale is effected by delivery of documents both by the seller, with documents relating to the goods, and by the buyer, with documents representing payment.

Chapter

This chapter identifies what amounts to an international sale, discusses the ways in which the nature of the law of international sales of goods differs from domestic sales, and explores how documents are used to deal with some of the legal risks associated with contracts involving international deliveries. It then looks at a typical international sale in outline, before focusing in detail on how the bill of lading, perhaps the most characteristic document used in international sales, operates. In this way the chapter introduces the concept of the documentary sale, where the mechanics of the completion of a sale is effected by delivery of documents both by the seller, with documents relating to the goods, and by the buyer, with documents representing payment.