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Chapter

Cover Intellectual Property Law

26. Subject Matter: The Requirement that there be a Design  

L. Bently, B. Sherman, D. Gangjee, and P. Johnson

This chapter considers the requirements for a design to be protected, with particular reference to the requirement that there be a design. It begins by outlining the requirements for validity before turning to the definition of ‘design’ with respect to registered designs in the UK as well as unregistered designs, citing three key elements of this definition: appearance, features, and product. It also examines three types of design that are excluded from the very broad definition of design: designs dictated solely by technical function; designs for products that must be produced in a specific way to enable them to connect to another product; and designs that are contrary to morality or public policy.

Chapter

Cover Essential Cases: Public Law

R v Bow Street Metropolitan Stipendiary Magistrate, ex parte Pinochet Ugarte (No. 2) [2000] 1 AC 119, House of Lords  

Essential Cases: Public Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v Bow Street Metropolitan Stipendiary Magistrate, ex parte Pinochet Ugarte (No. 2) [2000] 1 AC 119, House of Lords. This case considered what types of interest, in addition to pecuniary interests, should require a judge to recuse themselves from sitting on a case. The document also includes supporting commentary and questions from author Thomas Webb.

Chapter

Cover Essential Cases: Public Law

R v Bow Street Metropolitan Stipendiary Magistrate, ex parte Pinochet Ugarte (No. 2) [2000] 1 AC 119, House of Lords  

Essential Cases: Public Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v Bow Street Metropolitan Stipendiary Magistrate, ex parte Pinochet Ugarte (No. 2) [2000] 1 AC 119, House of Lords. This case considered what types of interest, in addition to pecuniary interests, should require a judge to recuse themselves from sitting on a case. The document also includes supporting commentary and questions from author Thomas Webb.

Chapter

Cover Legal Systems & Skills

10. Persuasive oral communication and presentations  

Scott Slorach, Judith Embley, Peter Goodchild, and Catherine Shephard

This chapter first explains the fundamental oral communication skills law students need, including non-verbal communication such as eye contact and body language. It then shows students how to use these skills to deliver an effective presentation during legal studies, whether in class, for an assessment, or otherwise, such as in a law clinic. It then goes on to develop these skills for practice, and provides guidance as to why, when, and how a lawyer must employ persuasive oral communication with clients.