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Chapter

Cover Contract Law

12. Breach of contract and termination  

This chapter examines breach of contract and the remedy of termination. It discusses: (1) what constitutes breach of contract; (2) the types of breach that will entitle a claimant to elect whether to end (terminate) the contract and sue for damages; namely, conditions and innominate terms the breach of which deprive the claimant of substantially the whole benefit expected under the contract; (3) how terms are classified into conditions, warranties, and innominate terms; (4) the nature and effect of terminating a contract; (5) when the claimant can insist on continuing with performance (affirmation) when the defendant does not want to perform the contract; and (4) the additional special remedies available to consumers in certain cases.

Chapter

Cover Murphy on Evidence

6. Witnesses  

Competence and compellability; oaths and affirmations

This chapter is divided into two parts. The first part discusses the law on witness competence and compatibility. The general rule of law in England and Wales is that all witnesses, including children, are competent (able to give evidence) and witnesses are also compellable (liable to be required to give evidence subject to sanction for contempt). Particular rules apply to children and persons under disability, the accused in a criminal case, and spouses and civil partners. The second part deals with oaths and affirmations, covering the requirement of sworn evidence; the effect of oaths and affirmations; and exceptions to the requirement of sworn evidence.

Chapter

Cover Poole's Textbook on Contract Law

13. Breach of contract  

Robert Merkin, Séverine Saintier, and Jill Poole

Course-focused and comprehensive, Poole’s Textbook on Contract Law provides an accessible overview of the key areas on the law curriculum. There are four ways to discharge a contract: by performance, agreement, frustration, or breach. The standard of performance required in relation to each contractual obligation needs to be identified because a failure to perform to the required standard constitutes a breach. In the absence of lawful excuse, a breach of contract arises if a party either fails or refuses to perform a contractual obligation imposed on that party by the terms of the contract or performs a contractual obligation in a defective manner. While every breach of contract will give rise to a right to claim damages, the contract will remain in force unless the breach constitutes a repudiatory breach. The chapter examines the types of repudiatory breaches and the election to terminate or affirm, together with an assessment of the law governing the identification of a repudiatory breach and the consequences of terminating when the breach is not in fact repudiatory. It also examines the options available to the non-breaching party when an anticipatory breach occurs.

Chapter

Cover Contract Law Directions

12. Specific remedies  

Without assuming prior legal knowledge, books in the Directions series introduce and guide readers through key points of law and legal debate. Questions, diagrams and exercises help readers to engage fully with each subject and check their understanding as they progress. This chapter considers remedies that directly address the issue of providing the innocent party with the performance that was expected. Their use depends on a number of factors, which means that they are not universally available, and that the claimant will therefore often be left to his remedy in damages. The discussions cover actions for the price or other agreed sum, the rule in White and Carter v McGregor, affirmation and anticipatory breach. The chapter goes on to discuss specific performance and injunctions and the tests of damages being inadequate, mutuality plus other factors such as personal service contracts and the relevance of the need for supervision.

Chapter

Cover Contract Law Directions

12. Specific remedies  

Without assuming prior legal knowledge, books in the Directions series introduce and guide readers through key points of law and legal debate. Questions, diagrams and exercises help readers to engage fully with each subject and check their understanding as they progress. This chapter considers remedies that directly address the issue of providing the innocent party with the performance that was expected. Their use depends on a number of factors, which means that they are not universally available, and that the claimant will therefore often be left to his remedy in damages. The discussions cover actions for the price or other agreed sum, the rule in White and Carter v McGregor, affirmation and anticipatory breach. The chapter goes on to discuss specific performance and injunctions and the tests of damages being inadequate, mutuality plus other factors such as personal service contracts and the relevance of the need for supervision.

Chapter

Cover Poole's Casebook on Contract Law

13. Breach of contract  

Robert Merkin and Séverine Saintier

Poole’s Casebook on Contract Law provides a comprehensive selection of case law that addresses all aspects of the subject encountered on undergraduate courses. The performance obligations of the parties to a contract are determined by contractual terms. A breach of contract arises when a party fails to fully comply with a performance obligation, without lawful excuse. If a contractual obligation is strict, failure to comply constitutes a breach of contract regardless of fault. Subject to an enforceable exemption clause, the injured party is entitled to damages to compensate for the loss suffered as a result of the breach. This chapter focuses on breach of contract and its legal consequences. It discusses the election on repudiatory breach; termination or affirmation of a contract; the classification of terms: conditions, warranties, and innominate or intermediate terms; the ‘entire obligation rule’; and anticipatory breach.

Chapter

Cover Poole's Casebook on Contract Law

13. Breach of contract  

Robert Merkin KC, Séverine Saintier, and Jill Poole

Poole’s Casebook on Contract Law provides a comprehensive selection of case law that addresses all aspects of the subject encountered on undergraduate courses. The performance obligations of the parties to a contract are determined by contractual terms. A breach of contract arises when a party fails to fully comply with a performance obligation, without lawful excuse. If a contractual obligation is strict, failure to comply constitutes a breach of contract regardless of fault. Subject to an enforceable exemption clause, the injured party is entitled to damages to compensate for the loss suffered as a result of the breach. This chapter focuses on breach of contract and its legal consequences. It discusses the election on repudiatory breach; termination or affirmation of a contract; the classification of terms: conditions, warranties, and innominate or intermediate terms; the ‘entire obligation rule’; and anticipatory breach.