1-20 of 21 Results

  • Keyword: Supreme Court x
Clear all

Chapter

This chapter explains the practice and procedure involved in appealing against a decision of the magistrates’ court or the Crown Court. The discussions include the reopening of a case; appeal to the Crown Court; appeal by way of case stated; judicial review; appeal against sentence from the Crown Court; appeal to the Supreme Court; the Criminal Cases Review Commission; and whether the prosecution enjoys a right to appeal.

Chapter

This chapter considers the structure of non-family civil appeals. It covers routes of appeal; permission to appeal; time for appealing; procedure on appealing; respondent’s notice; applications within appeals stay; striking out appeal notices and setting aside or imposing conditions; hearing of appeals; appeal court’s powers; appeals by way of case stated; and appeals to the Supreme Court.

Chapter

Martin Hannibal and Lisa Mountford

This chapter explains the practice and procedure involved in appealing against a decision of the magistrates’ court or the Crown Court. The discussions include the reopening of a case; appeal to the Crown Court; appeal by way of case stated; judicial review; appeal against sentence from the Crown Court; appeal to the Supreme Court; the Criminal Cases Review Commission; and whether the prosecution enjoys a right to appeal.

Chapter

This chapter considers the structure of non-family civil appeals. It covers routes of appeal; permission to appeal; time for appealing; procedure on appealing; respondent’s notice; applications within appeals stay; striking out appeal notices and setting aside or imposing conditions; hearing of appeals; appeal court’s powers; appeals by way of case stated; and appeals to the Supreme Court.

Chapter

This chapter considers the structure of non-family civil appeals. It covers routes of appeal; permission to appeal; time for appealing; procedure on appealing; respondent’s notice; applications within appeals stay; striking out appeal notices and setting aside or imposing conditions; hearing of appeals; appeal court’s powers; appeals by way of case stated; and appeals to the Supreme Court.

Chapter

This chapter discusses the English court system, civil disputes, and alternative dispute resolution. The courts in England and Wales form a hierarchy. At the lowest level are the Magistrates’ Courts and the County Courts, then the Crown Court and High Court, then the Court of Appeal, and finally the Supreme Court. The chapter considers the role of the Court of Justice of the European Union in interpreting EU law within Member States. It explains the position of the European Court of Human Rights, which deals with allegations of state breaches of the European Convention on Human Rights. Civil disputes arise in every area of business. An explanation of the civil procedure rules from commencing a claim to enforcement of a court judgment is provided. The chapter concludes with a discussion of alternative methods of dispute resolution including arbitration, mediation, and conciliation.

Chapter

Titles in the Complete series combine extracts from a wide range of primary materials with clear explanatory text to provide readers with a complete introductory resource. This chapter discusses the origin of equity and trusts as distinctive aspects of the English legal system and the subsequent merger of equity with the common. It covers the meaning and origin of equity; what became of the chancery jurisdiction after the Earl of Oxford but before the Judicature Act; the reform of the Court of Equity; the Supreme Court of Judicature Acts 1873–5; the modern relevance of equity; the types and nature of trusts; and the recognition of trusts.

Chapter

Steve Peers and Darren Harvey

The UK left the EU on 31 January 2020, following the results of the Brexit referendum of June 2016. How does the process for leaving the EU work, and what legal issues does it raise?

Chapter

When examining the recent evolution of the Constitution, it is argued that the UK has become more ‘legal’ as opposed to ‘political’. The last twenty years has seen a growth in legislation and case law, particularly that of the Supreme Court, regulating aspects of the UK constitution. This chapter investigates this claim. It argues that, whilst we can point to a growth in both legislation and case law, when we look at the case law more closely we can see that the courts balance an array of factors when determining how far to control executive actions. These factors include an analysis of the relative institutional features and constitutional role of the legislature, the executive and the courts. This evidence, in turn, questions the traditional understanding of the separation of powers as a hidden component of the UK constitution. It is not the case that courts merely balance the rule of law and parliamentary sovereignty in order to determine how far to control executive actions. Rather, the courts determine how to make this balance through the lens of the separation of powers, evaluating institutional and constitutional features. In doing so, they are upholding necessary checks and balances in the UK constitution.

Chapter

This chapter begins with discussions of the role of the judiciary in the UK, its relationships with other institutions, and qualifications for being a judge. It then considers the issue of judicial independence and how independence can be retained while ensuring that judges are accountable. There is a mini case study on the controversies surrounding media criticism of the judges following the decisions in the Miller case. The chapter also considers impartiality; the appointment of judges; the need to improve diversity of the judiciary; and the use of judges to chair public inquiries.

Chapter

This chapter draws together the main themes of the book in the light of current debates and comes to some general conclusions relating to the contemporary form of the administrative state and of administrative law. In doing so the chapter not only identifies the impact of cuts in legal aid, but considers the developing role of the Supreme Court (launched in 2009) and increased transparency under the Freedom of Information Act 2000. Against the backdrop of the debate over Brexit and the possible repeal of the Human Rights Act 1998, there is discussion of the attempts to reach a constitutional balance between Parliament and the courts.

Chapter

Essential Cases: EU Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Gerhard Köbler v Republik Österreich (Case C-224/01), EU:C:2003:513, [2003] ECR I-10239, 30 September 2003. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Noreen O’Meara.

Chapter

Essential Cases: EU Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Gerhard Köbler v Republik Österreich (Case C-224/01), EU:C:2003:513, [2003] ECR I-10239, 30 September 2003. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Noreen O’Meara.

Chapter

Essential Cases: EU Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Gerhard Köbler v Republik Österreich (Case C-224/01), EU:C:2003:513, [2003] ECR I-10239, 30 September 2003. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Noreen O'Meara.

Book

Honeyball & Bowers’ Textbook on Employment Law provides a concise account of the essentials of employment law while offering critical and contextual insights into the debates shaping this area of law. This volume considers both individual and collective issues as well as examining the role of the EU in UK employment law. A separate chapter on human rights looks at the role human rights legislation plays in the development of employment law. The title takes account of new Supreme Court decisions including Bates van Winkelhof on the working status of partners; Hounga on race discrimination; Chhabra on the implied contractual right to a fair disciplinary procedure and E. Ivor Hughes Education Foundation on collective redundancies consultation. New legislation covered includes the Modern Slavery Act 2015 concerning trafficking of workers and slavery; the Small Business, Enterprise and Employment Act 2015 which includes measures on equal pay transparency, whistle-blowing and unpaid tribunal awards and the Shared Parental Leave Regulations allowing parental leave to be shared between parents at times of their choosing. The Trade Union Bill is also considered which, when enacted, will make taking industrial action much more difficult.

Chapter

Extracts have been chosen from a wide range of historical and contemporary cases to illustrate the reasoning processes of the courts and to show how legal principles are developed. This chapter examines the notion of judicial independence. It discusses the Constitutional Reform Act 2005 and its provisions reforming the office of the Lord Chancellor, establishing a new Supreme Court, and restructuring judicial appointments. Judicial diversity and discipline, along with further change to the judicial appointments process, are also considered. The chapter also considers the accountability of the judiciary to Parliament and the public, and the relationship between judicial independence and parliamentary privilege.

Chapter

This chapter examines the notion of judicial independence. It discusses the Constitutional Reform Act 2005 and its provisions reforming the office of the Lord Chancellor, establishing a new Supreme Court, and restructuring judicial appointments. Judicial diversity and discipline, along with further change to the judicial appointments process, are also considered. The chapter also considers the accountability of the judiciary to Parliament and the public, and the relationship between judicial independence and parliamentary privilege.

Book

Edited by Sir Jeffrey Jowell and Colm O'Cinneide

Since its first edition in 1985, The Changing Constitution has provided analysis of the key issues surrounding the UK’s constitutional development, and debates around reform. The ninth edition of this volume is published at a time of constitutional turbulence, with Brexit putting pressure on key aspects of the UK’s unwritten constitutional system. Other aspects of the UK constitution are also in a state of flux, and continue to generate political and legal controversy: the legal protection of human rights, understanding of parliamentary sovereignty and the rule of law, separation of powers, restructuring of the system of justice, the regulation of access to information and data privacy, and pressures for increased devolution to Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. These issues and more are covered in this latest edition of one of the UK’s leading texts on the constitution, which includes contributions from a range of leading public law scholars.

Chapter

Ben McFarlane, Nicholas Hopkins, and Sarah Nield

All books in this flagship series contain carefully selected substantial extracts from key cases, legislation, and academic debate, providing able students with a stand-alone resource.This chapter examines the mechanics of how the Human Rights Act 1998 (HRA 1998) brings human rights home. It then explores Art 1 of the First Protocol (protection of possessions) and Art 8 (respect for the home). Article 14 (protection from discrimination) and Art 6 (right to a fair trial) are also outlined. Whilst compliance with Art 1 of the First Protocol has required little change in domestic law, a recent string of cases concerning compliance with Art 8 and repossession of the home has demonstrated that a new approach is necessary to comply with human rights norms.

Book

Without assuming prior legal knowledge, books in the Directions series introduce and guide readers through key points of law and legal debate. Questions, diagrams and exercises help readers to engage fully with each subject and check their understanding as they progress. This book explains the key topics covered on equity and trusts courses. The content of the text is designed to emphasise the relationship between equity, trusts, property, contract and restitution to enable students to map out conceptual connections between related legal ideas. There is also a focus on modern cases in the commercial sphere to reflect the constantly changing and socially significant role of trusts and equity. The book starts by introducing equity and trusts. It then includes a chapter on understanding trusts, and moves on to consider capacity and formality requirements, certainty requirements and the constitution of trusts. Various types of trusts are then examined such as purpose, charitable, and variation trusts. The book then describes issues related to trusteeship. Breach of trust is explained, as is informal trusts of land. There is a chapter on tracing, and then the book concludes by looking at equitable liability of strangers to trust and equitable doctrines and remedies. This new edition includes coverage of significant recent cases, including the Supreme Court decision on interest to be paid by tax authorities on monies owed; the Supreme Court decision on the test of dishonesty applicable to civil matters; the Privy Council decision on the division of investment property acquired by cohabitants; the Court of Appeal decisions on Quistclose trusts; fiduciary duties in arms-length contracts; transactions prejudicing creditors; beneficiary anonymity in variation of trust cases; exemption clauses; discretion exercised beyond trustee’s authority; implications of GDPR for trustee disclosures; trustee personal liability; causation and equitable compensation; statutory relief for a professional trustee’s breach of trust; use of proprietary estoppel to reward work undertaken in farming families; costs of seeking court’s directions; injunctions ordered against persons unknown; equitable jurisdiction to rectify agreements.