1-8 of 8 Results

  • Keyword: Misrepresentation Act 1967 x
Clear all

Chapter

Cover JC Smith's The Law of Contract

16. Misrepresentation  

This chapter discusses misrepresentation in contract law. Misrepresentation is a statement of fact or law which is false, that induces a party to enter into the contract. A misrepresentation may be made by words or by conduct. All misrepresentations entitle the misrepresentee to rescind the contract. However, rescission will be barred where it is impossible to put the parties back into their original position; or where the misrepresentee has affirmed the contract; or where a long period of time has elapsed; or where a third party who has acquired rights for value in good faith would be disadvantaged by rescission. Damages are available at common law for the tort of deceit or for negligent misrepresentation. Most claims for damages are now made under section 2(1) of the Misrepresentation Act 1967.

Chapter

Cover Contract Law

17. Misrepresentation  

A misrepresentation induces a party to enter into a contract but typically is not part of the contract itself. The chapter examines the different types of misrepresentation (fraudulent, negligent, or innocent) and the remedies that the law provides in respect of a misrepresentation. The chapter focuses on the liability for misrepresentation. It begins by examining the definition of a misrepresentation. The chapter considers the extent to which English law recognizes the existence of a duty of disclosure and goes on to discuss the concept of rescission. It then explores how misrepresentation gives rise to a claim for damages, with a particular focus on section 2 of the Misrepresentation Act 1967. The final section examines the possibility of excluding liability for misrepresentation.

Chapter

Cover O'Sullivan & Hilliard's The Law of Contract

9. Misrepresentation and non-disclosure  

Titles in the Core Text series take the reader straight to the heart of the subject, providing focused, concise, and reliable guides for students at all levels. This chapter examines issues related to pre-contractual misrepresentation, which is a vitiating factor. It explains what counts as an actionable misrepresentation and discusses its distinction with the treatment of non-disclosure. It explores the elements for an actionable misrepresentation and the test of cause/reliance. It considers the remedies for misrepresentation, namely rescission which involves setting the contract aside and restoring the parties to the pre-contractual position, and damages, which are available at common law for fraudulent misrepresentation and under the Misrepresentation Act 1967 for other misrepresentations unless the misrepresentor can discharge the burden of reasonable grounds for belief. This chapter also explains that any clause that purports to exclude or restrict liability for misrepresentation is subject to the statutory requirement of reasonableness (for non-consumer contracts), and the normal CRA test of fairness (for consumer contracts).

Chapter

Cover Contract Law

5. Misrepresentation and non-disclosure  

In general, contract parties need not disclose important matters about the transaction to each other. But, those who make false statements to induce the other party’s consent to the contract may find themselves liable for damages for misrepresentation and their contracts set aside. This chapter examines: (1) what must be proved in an action for misrepresentation; (2) what, if any, duty is imposed for non-disclosure; (3) when a contract can be set aside (rescinded) for misrepresentation; (4) the different types of money awards that can be made for misrepresentation; (5) the extent to which the parties can exclude or limit liability for making a misrepresentation; (6) the recourse that consumers have against misleading and aggressive practices; and (7) the justifications underlying the remedies for misrepresentation.

Chapter

Cover Poole's Casebook on Contract Law

9. Misrepresentation  

Robert Merkin and Séverine Saintier

Poole’s Casebook on Contract Law provides a comprehensive selection of case law that addresses all aspects of the subject encountered on undergraduate courses. A contract may include a statement that is a mere puff, a representation, or a contractual term. In the case of a representation, the maker asserts the truth of certain facts and thus induces the contract. In case of an actionable misrepresentation (an unambiguous false statement of fact which induces the other party to enter into the contract), the contract may be rendered voidable; that is, liable to be set aside or rescinded. In some instances, the injured party may claim for damages designed to restore him to his original position. This chapter examines the identification of actionable misrepresentation, duties of disclosure, types of misrepresentations, rescission as a remedy, damages for misrepresentation, including the damages available in s. 2 of the Misrepresentation Act 1967, and the effect of contributory negligence in any damages award. Finally, the chapter examines exclusion of liability for non-fraudulent misrepresentation and the effect of ‘non-reliance’ clauses in contracts. In the consumer context, it also notes the criminal offences in certain instances of misrepresentation under the Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008 (CPRs) and the extension to include civil remedies for misleading actions.

Chapter

Cover Koffman, Macdonald & Atkins' Law of Contract

13. Misrepresentation  

This chapter looks at misrepresentation. It first identifies the requirements for a misrepresentation, and highlights the situations in which the courts are willing to find misrepresentations although prima facie there are only statements of opinion which are stated not to suffice in themselves. It considers the remedy of rescission, and when it will be barred. It looks at the different ways in which damages may be provided for misrepresentation: for fraudulent misrepresentation under the tort of deceit; for negligent misrepresentation under the tort of negligent misrepresentation; and for negligent misrepresentation under s2(1) of the Misrepresentation Act 1967. It looks at the different requirements for each type, which it will be advisable to use, and what will be covered by a damages remedy for misrepresentation. Consideration is also given to remedies for aggressive and misleading trade practices under the amended Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations.

Chapter

Cover Poole's Casebook on Contract Law

9. Misrepresentation  

Robert Merkin KC, Séverine Saintier, and Jill Poole

Poole’s Casebook on Contract Law provides a comprehensive selection of case law that addresses all aspects of the subject encountered on undergraduate courses. A contract may include a statement that is a mere puff, a representation, or a contractual term. In the case of a representation, the maker asserts the truth of certain facts and thus induces the contract. In case of an actionable misrepresentation (an unambiguous false statement of fact which induces the other party to enter into the contract), the contract may be rendered voidable; that is, liable to be set aside or rescinded. In some instances, the injured party may claim for damages designed to restore him to his original position. This chapter examines the identification of actionable misrepresentation, duties of disclosure, types of misrepresentations, rescission as a remedy, damages for misrepresentation, including the damages available in s. 2 of the Misrepresentation Act 1967, and the effect of contributory negligence in any damages award. Finally, the chapter examines exclusion of liability for non-fraudulent misrepresentation and the effect of ‘non-reliance’ clauses in contracts. In the consumer context, it also notes the criminal offences in certain instances of misrepresentation under the Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008 (CPRs) and the extension to include civil remedies for misleading actions.

Chapter

Cover Contract Law Concentrate

9. Misrepresentation  

Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. Concentrates show you what to expect in a law exam, what examiners are looking for, and how to achieve extra marks. This chapter discusses the identification of actionable misrepresentations which affect the fairness of the process by which a contract was entered into, and render that contract voidable for misrepresentation (liable to be set aside and the parties restored to their pre-contractual positions). It identifies three types of misrepresentation depending on the state of mind of the misrepresentor: fraudulent, negligent, or innocent. It distinguishes between remedies available for the different types of pre-contractual statements, specifically rescission and damages for the different types of misrepresentations, and briefly explains the distinction between commercial contracts and the remedies available to consumers under the Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008.