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Chapter

This chapter describes and discusses the different types of judge, and their roles, within the English legal system. This includes the Lord Chancellor, Supreme Court Justices, Appeal Court judges, circuit judges, district judges, coroners, and lay magistrates. The qualifications for appointment are outlined and the system of judicial appointments is discussed, including the role of the Judicial Appointments Commission. The chapter includes a day in the life of a district judge to give some context to the every-day work of the judiciary. There is also comment supplied upon the issues of diversity of membership of the judiciary and the importance of independence of the judiciary.

Chapter

This chapter describes and discusses the different types of judge, and their roles, within the English legal system. An outline of the system of judicial appointments is given. There is also comment supplied upon the issues of diversity of membership of the judiciary and the importance of independence of the judiciary.

Chapter

This chapter focuses on the different types of professional judges. Part-time judges are solicitors or barristers who are appointed to sit between fifteen and fifty days a year as judges. Full-time judges include Supreme Court Justices, Court of Appeal Judges, High Court Judges, and Circuit Judges. The senior judiciary includes the Lord Chief Justice of England, who represents the views of the judiciary to Parliament and Government, and the Master of the Rolls, who is responsible for supervising all the records of the Court of Chancery, advising the Lord Chancellor, and being the Chancellor's deputy judge. All the judges are appointed by the Queen on the advice of the Lord Chancellor. The Judicial Appointments Commission collects information about judicial candidates and assesses their suitability. The most senior judges in the land are appointed by the Queen on the advice of the Prime Minister.