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Chapter

Without assuming prior legal knowledge, books in the Directions series introduce and guide readers through key points of law and legal debate. It discusses European Convention law and relates it to domestic law under the HRA. Questions, discussion points and thinking points help readers to engage fully with each subject and check their understanding as they progress and knowledge can be tested by self-test questions and exam questions at the chapter end. This chapter discusses Article 5 the right to liberty. This is liberty in its classic sense, addressing the physical liberty of a person (as opposed to broader concepts of liberty, such as the sense of personal autonomy and the lack of individual or social subordination). Article 5 deals with restrictions of liberty like arrest and detention by the police, imprisonment after conviction, detention of the mentally ill in hospitals, and the detention of foreigners in the context of immigration and asylum. It defines and restricts the purposes for which a person can be deprived of his or her liberty and, importantly, requires that people have access to judicial supervision so that the lawfulness of any deprivation of liberty can be examined and, if necessary, remedied. The overriding guarantee of Article 5 is the right not to be detained in an arbitrary manner.

Chapter

Without assuming prior legal knowledge, books in the Directions series introduce and guide readers through key points of law and legal debate. It discusses European Convention law and relates it to domestic law under the HRA. Questions, discussion points, and thinking points help readers to engage fully with each subject and check their understanding as they progress and knowledge can be tested by self-test questions and exam questions at the chapter end. This chapter discusses Article 5 the right to liberty. This is liberty in its classic sense, addressing the physical liberty of a person (as opposed to broader concepts of liberty, such as the sense of personal autonomy and the lack of individual or social subordination). Article 5 deals with restrictions of liberty like arrest and detention by the police, imprisonment after conviction, detention of the mentally ill in hospitals, and the detention of foreigners in the context of immigration and asylum. It defines and restricts the purposes for which a person can be deprived of his or her liberty and, importantly, requires that people have access to judicial supervision so that the lawfulness of any deprivation of liberty can be examined and, if necessary, remedied. The overriding guarantee of Article 5 is the right not to be detained in an arbitrary manner.

Chapter

This chapter discusses amendments to the Mental Capacity Act (MCA 2005), introduced in the Mental Health Act 2007, which are generally known as the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DOLS). It begins with an overview of the DOLS and then considers the triggering issue for the applicability of the DOLS, namely whether there is a deprivation of liberty. The chapter outlines the six requirements for application of the DOLS: (i) age requirement; (ii) mental health requirement; (iii) mental capacity requirement; (iv) best interests requirement; (v) no refusals requirement; and (vi) eligibility.

Chapter

This chapter examines international human rights laws on the right to liberty. It first considers slavery, the most serious threat to an individual’s right to liberty, and then discusses the application of the general rights of liberty and security of person, and the detention of individuals.

Chapter

This chapter examines international human rights laws on the right to liberty. It first considers slavery, the most serious threat to an individual’s right to liberty, and then discusses the application of the general rights of liberty and security of person, including the detention of individuals. For many people, liberty is regarded as one of the central tenets of personal freedom; hence slavery and practices analogous to slavery are viewed as morally repugnant and usually legally indefensible. Nevertheless, there are circumstances in which States can restrict liberty, for legitimate purposes, without infringing human rights. This has been demonstrated during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Chapter

This chapter examines whether the law provides adequate mechanisms for those brought under the mental health system to ensure that they are dealt with consistently with the substantive and procedural rules provided by the law, and whether sufficient recompense is available in the event that the standards are not complied with. The discussions cover review tribunals; judicial review; civil and criminal actions; the Mental Health Act (MHA) 1983 and the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards; criminal prosecutions; civil actions for damages; complaint processes; the appointment of advocates to help people governed by the MHA 1983 and the Mental Capacity Act 2005; and representing people with mental disabilities.

Chapter

Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. Concentrates show you what to expect in a law exam, what examiners are looking for, and how to achieve extra marks. This chapter focuses on statutory provisions governing mental health and mental health disorders, with particular reference to the Mental Health Act 1983 and the Mental Capacity Act 2005. It first outlines modern approaches to mental disorders, including legal reforms and the MHA 1983 Code of Practice (2015). It considers the main routes by which patients are admitted to the mental health system (voluntary or involuntary), deprivation of liberty, and the issue of consent with regards to medical treatment. Finally, the chapter discusses community care that must be provided to people with mental health disorders following discharge from hospital, particularly after-care and supervised community treatment orders. Relevant court cases are cited where appropriate.

Chapter

This chapter focuses on statutory provisions governing mental health and mental health disorders, with particular reference to the Mental Health Act 1983 and the Mental Capacity Act 2005. It first outlines modern approaches to mental disorders, including legal reforms and the MHA 1983 Code of Practice (2015). It considers the main routes by which patients are admitted to the mental health system (voluntary or involuntary), deprivation of liberty, including Cheshire West and the proposed liberty protection safeguards, and the issue of consent with regards to medical treatment. Finally, the chapter discusses community care that must be provided to people with mental health disorders following discharge from hospital, particularly aftercare and supervised community treatment orders. Relevant cases are considered.