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Chapter

This chapter examines the appeals system, the most important purpose of which from the legal system’s point of view is the development and clarification of the law. Reviewing the law in this way allows the higher courts to exert some control over the lower courts and adds much to an understanding of the forces shaping the appeals system. From the point of view of litigants, appeals offer a chance to challenge a result they are unhappy with. The chapter discusses restrictions on appeal rights; challenging jury verdicts; due process appeals; post-appeal review of convictions by the Criminal Cases Review Commission; miscarriages of justice, prosecution appeals; and double jeopardy and retrials.

Chapter

This chapter explains the practice and procedure involved in appealing against a decision of the magistrates’ court or the Crown Court. The discussions include the reopening of a case; appeal to the Crown Court; appeal by way of case stated; judicial review; appeal against sentence from the Crown Court; appeal to the Supreme Court; the Criminal Cases Review Commission; and whether the prosecution enjoys a right to appeal.

Chapter

Martin Hannibal and Lisa Mountford

This chapter explains the practice and procedure involved in appealing against a decision of the magistrates’ court or the Crown Court. The discussions include the reopening of a case; appeal to the Crown Court; appeal by way of case stated; judicial review; appeal against sentence from the Crown Court; appeal to the Supreme Court; the Criminal Cases Review Commission; and whether the prosecution enjoys a right to appeal.

Chapter

Alisdair A. Gillespie and Siobhan Weare

This chapter examines under what circumstances someone is entitled to appeal and how that appeal is heard. The discussions cover summary trials or trials on indictment; appeals from a summary trial; appeal from a trial on indictment; appeal following an acquittal; appeal against sentence; appeals to the Supreme Court; and the Criminal Cases Review Commission. The paths of appeals differ depending on the mode of trial of the original criminal hearing. There are two potential criminal appeal avenues from a summary trial: either to the Divisional Court (by way of case stated or (exceptionally) judicial review) or to the Crown Court. An appeal ordinarily requires leave (permission) but appealing to the Crown Court from the magistrates’ court does not require leave.

Chapter

Alisdair A. Gillespie and Siobhan Weare

This chapter examines under what circumstances someone is entitled to appeal and how that appeal is heard. The discussions cover summary trials or trials on indictment; appeals from a summary trial; appeal from a trial on indictment; appeal following an acquittal; appeal against sentence; appeals to the Supreme Court; and the Criminal Cases Review Commission. The paths of appeals differ depending on the mode of trial of the original criminal hearing. There are two potential criminal appeal avenues from a summary trial: either to the Divisional Court (by way of case stated or (exceptionally) judicial review) or to the Crown Court. An appeal ordinarily requires leave (permission) but appealing to the Crown Court from the magistrates’ court does not require leave.