1-20 of 134 Results

  • Keyword: Brexit x
Clear all

Chapter

This chapter introduces some of the key ideas that will be encountered in the rest of the book, such as what is required for a contract. It touches upon the everyday role of contract, and that, although the book is heavily concerned with case law, contract disputes are often resolved without resort to the courts. It also introduces the idea of the evolution of contract law with the changing nature of society: the limitations placed on the use of an idea, such as ‘freedom of contract’, through recognition of the impact of inequality of bargaining power. Additionally, it alerts the reader to the impact of the EU and Brexit.

Chapter

This introductory chapter traces the development of the European Union. Since its inception in 1952, the EU has matured and developed from a Community of like-minded states into a Union of a greater diversity of states, with a comprehensive legal system which is increasingly penetrating the national legal systems of Member States. From the six original members, the EU now counts 27 Member States. Eleven of the thirteen newer Member States are in Central and Eastern Europe, and have discarded their old Communist regimes, turning into democracies with the qualifications to join the Union. The latest developments and changes, including Brexit and the effects of Covid-19, are also discussed.

Chapter

This chapter is, for obvious reasons, not a modification of the chapter from the previous edition. It is a completely new chapter, which considers the effect of Brexit on the UK constitution. There is discussion of the constitutional implications of triggering exit from the EU, and whether this could be done by the executive via the prerogative, or whether this was conditional on prior legislative approval through a statute. The discussion thereafter considers the constitutional implications of Brexit in terms of supremacy, rights, executive accountability to the legislature and devolution. The chapter concludes with discussion as to the paradox of sovereignty in the context of Brexit.

Chapter

Essential Cases: EU Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R.O. (Case C-327/18 PPU), EU:C:2018:733, 19 September 2018. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Noreen O’Meara.

Chapter

Essential Cases: EU Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Wightman and others (Case C-621/18), EU:C:2018:999, 10 December 2018. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Noreen O’Meara.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Public Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case note summarizes the facts and decision in R (on the application of Miller and Cherry) v Prime Minister and Advocate General for Scotland [2019] UKSC 41, Supreme Court. This case concerned the constitutional-legal limits on a Prime Minister’s capacity to advise the monarch to exercise their power to prorogue Parliament. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Thomas Webb.

Chapter

This chapter deals with the European law governing jurisdiction in divorce and the international law concepts that are a feature of this area of law. It discusses the increasingly important question of jurisdiction in divorce proceedings, and explains the concepts of ‘domicile’which includes domicile of origin, domicile of dependence, and domicile of choice. It also explains the concept of ‘habitual residence’ as how both domicile and habitual residence apply to divorce proceedings. There is finally an outline of jurisdiction in practice and the rule that if the domicile of a client is uncertain then habitual residence is usually easier to establish. There is some mention of Brexit.

Chapter

The Concentrate Questions and Answers series offer the best preparation for tackling exam questions. Each book includes typical questions, bullet-pointed answer plans and suggested answers, author commentary and illustrative diagrams and flowcharts. This chapter presents sample exam questions along with examiner’s tips, answer plans, and suggested answers about the supremacy of EU law and its reception in Member States. Both the legal arguments for supremacy and the political logic are often considered in establishing the reasoning for EU law supremacy. The first question concentrates on the reasons for EU law supremacy from the point of view of the Union and in the view of the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU (or also abbreviated CoJ)). A general question about the exit process of a state by a Member State in the light of Brexit is included.

Chapter

D Fox, RJC Munday, B Soyer, AM Tettenborn, and PG Turner

This chapter introduces the reader to commercial law. It first considers the nature of commercial law by focusing on the definitions offered by previous scholars of note. It then examines its function and historical development, and discusses various sources of commercial law such as contracts and national legislation. In addition it refers importantly to the role of equity and trusts in commercial law, to public law in the commercial arena, and to the philosophy and concepts of commercial law. Possible codification of commercial law is discussed. Finally, the chapter assesses the challenges for commercial law in the twenty-first century and briefly discusses the impact of Brexit on English commercial law.

Chapter

This chapter explains the process and significance of the UK’s membership in the EU and sets out the authorities underpinning the supremacy of EU law, accepted and established prior to the UK’s accession. It then explores cases—from the early 1970s to the present day—which consider the ways in which EU membership has impacted on Parliament’s sovereignty. Following this, the chapter explores the legal and political landscape of the UK’s departure from the EU. It considers the process through which Brexit is happening and the manner in which the constitution will provide the foundation for a working relationship with the EU in the future and establish a stable legal system in the UK post-Brexit, looking particularly at the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 and the European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Act 2020.

Chapter

Essential Cases: EU Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R.O. (Case C-327/18 PPU), EU:C:2018:733, 19 September 2018. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Noreen O’Meara.

Chapter

Essential Cases: EU Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Wightman and others (Case C-621/18), EU:C:2018:999, 10 December 2018. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Noreen O’Meara.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Public Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case note summarizes the facts and decision in R (on the application of Miller and Cherry) v Prime Minister and Advocate General for Scotland [2019] UKSC 41, Supreme Court. This case concerned the constitutional-legal limits on a Prime Minister’s capacity to advise the monarch to exercise their power to prorogue Parliament. The document also includes supporting commentary and questions from author Thomas Webb.

Chapter

This chapter examines how consumers are protected when they go online. It examines the extensive protections offered by the Consumer Rights Directive to distance agreements (including online agreements). The rules on jurisdiction, choice of law, and enforcement are examined alongside what rights the consumer has to receive information and to cancel contracts agreed at a distance. In addition, this chapter examines the suite of rights created by the Consumer Rights Act 2015 and in particular the new provisions therein which digital content (including software, apps, and in-game content among others). The chapter continues with a discussion of the regulation of unsolicited commercial communications or spam including a discussion of the Directive on Privacy and Electronic Communications, GDPR, and the proposed ePrivacy Regulation. The chapter accounts for changes in the legal framework caused by Brexit.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Public Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case note summarizes the facts and decision in R (on the application of Miller and Cherry) v Prime Minister and Advocate General for Scotland [2019] UKSC 41, Supreme Court. This case concerned the constitutional-legal limits on a Prime Minister’s capacity to advise the monarch to exercise their power to prorogue Parliament. The document also includes supporting commentary and questions from author Thomas Webb.

Chapter

Essential Cases: EU Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R.O. (Case C-327/18 PPU), EU:C:2018:733, 19 September 2018. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Noreen O'Meara.

Chapter

Essential Cases: EU Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Wightman and others (Case C-621/18), EU:C:2018:999, 10 December 2018. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Noreen O'Meara.

Chapter

Essential Cases: EU Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in SN and SD v Governor of Cloverhill Prison and others (Case C-479/21 PPU), EU:C:2021:929, 16 November 2021. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Noreen O'Meara.

Book

Sylvia de Mars

EU Law in the UK tackles this subject with a post-Brexit perspective. It has a contextual approach, aiming to present the topic in a fresh and relatable way. Topics covered include the history of the EU from 1972 to the present day, the EU institutions, decision making and democracy, EU legislative powers, and the limits to those powers. The text also looks at the relations between EU and national law, domestic law, and enforcing EU law. It also considers the internal (or common, or single) market, the free movement of goods and workers, EU citizenship, and the free movement of services. Competition law is also touched upon. Finally, the text looks towards the future and considers how the UK can negotiate a future relationship with the EU.

Chapter

This chapter examines the European Union rules on the free movement of goods as they impact on intellectual property rights. It discusses the tensions arising between the aims of creating a common market and intellectual property, with particular reference to the Treaty provisions relevant to this area. The chapter examines the relevant case law with a focus on intra-EEA parallel imports, repackaging, legitimate interests in opposing the further circulation of goods within the European Community, international exhaustion of rights, and the relation between IP rights and free movement of services. The chapter concludes with discussion of recent developments in exhaustion of rights in the online environment.