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Chapter

Cover A Practical Approach to Alternative Dispute Resolution

4. Funding ADR Procedures  

This chapter discusses the issue of funding alternative dispute resolution (ADR) procedures. Costs are a major motivation for undertaking ADR, but the costs position can be quite complex. Indeed, the separate elements of costs must all be considered. It is government policy to make more use of ADR, including online ADR, for lower-value cases so that dispute resolution is cost effective. Although a process like arbitration can be expensive, most ADR processes are relatively inexpensive, and information on costs is quite easily available from ADR providers. Ultimately, it is important for the lawyer to make an overall analysis of the financial position and risks to assist the client in taking an informed decision about litigation and ADR options. Costs may be considered as part of a negotiated or mediated settlement.

Chapter

Cover A Practical Approach to Alternative Dispute Resolution

9. Recovery of ADR Costs in Litigation  

This chapter addresses the recovery of alternative dispute resolution (ADR) costs in litigation. The court have power to make an order that the costs of interim applications in connection with ADR should be borne by one party if that party has acted unreasonably, otherwise the usual order will be ‘costs in the case’. If the parties embark on an ADR process and make a clear agreement as to their respective liabilities for the costs of that process, the court will not look behind it. Meanwhile, if the parties make no agreement about the costs of an ADR process, the court can determine liability for the costs of the ADR process. If the parties reach agreement on the main issues by an ADR process and agree that ADR costs should be determined by the court, the court is likely to make no order for costs (meaning each party will bear their own costs) unless it can determine, without trying the case, who would have won at trial.

Chapter

Cover A Practical Approach to Alternative Dispute Resolution

23. Recording Settlement  

This chapter explores the process of recording a settlement, which is the final part of the alternative dispute resolution (ADR) process. It is essential that all the issues between the parties are covered in a settlement agreement. If particular issues are deliberately left out of the agreement, or are left for further agreement, this should be made clear. The normal rules of contract law must also be adhered to, or the settlement will not be binding. While oral agreements are usually binding, the risk of misunderstandings means that it is invariably best practice to record the agreement in writing. The chapter then looks at the different methods of recording settlement agreements, including exchange of letters, contract or deed, interim order, consent order, and Tomlin order. Ultimately, when drawing up the agreement, it is important not to overlook how any existing proceedings are to be dealt with and on how the costs are to be paid.