1-8 of 8 Results

  • Keyword: subordination x
Clear all

Chapter

Ross Cranston, Emilios Avgouleas, Kristin van Zweiten, Theodor van Sante, and Christoper Hare

This chapter considers banks' securities activities. Many banks have compensated for the decline in traditional finance by emphasizing their securities activities. These range from the traditional task of investment banks in advising, underwriting, and distributing new issues of securities, through to dealing on their own account on securities and derivatives markets — proprietary trading. In the decade leading up to the Global Financial Crisis, banks also played a significant role in introducing new products to these markets, including asset-backed securities and credit derivatives. The onset of the crisis provoked intense scrutiny and widespread criticism of many of these activities, and led to the introduction of significant controls on the ability of banks to engage in them. The chapter discusses types of securities, subordination, and custody; distributing securities issues; and securities regulation.

Chapter

This chapter examines the various domestic sources of law in the UK, namely legislation, case law, and custom. Legislation comes in three forms: Acts of Parliament, subordinate legislation, and legal acts deriving from the European Union. This chapter describes the legislative process and discusses the tools of statutory interpretation through which legislation is interpreted by the courts. The chapter then moves on to look at case law, including a discussion of the doctrine of precedent and the distinction between the ratio decidendi and obiter dicta. Finally, the chapter concludes by looking at custom as source of law, noting the requirements in order for a custom to be given legal effect by the courts.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Equity & Trusts provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Re Hallett’s Estate (1880) 13 Ch D 696, Court of Appeal. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Derek Whayman.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Equity & Trusts provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Re Hallett’s Estate (1880) 13 Ch D 696, Court of Appeal. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Derek Whayman.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Equity & Trusts provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Re Hallett’s Estate (1880) 13 Ch D 696, Court of Appeal. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Derek Whayman.

Chapter

This chapter is about delegated legislation, also called ‘subordinate’ and ‘secondary’ legislation. It considers why the constitution allows ministers (part of the executive) to make such legislation and the process by which it is made. It examines a case study on a controversial attempt by the government to abolish numerous institutions through powers conferred by the Public Bodies Act 2011.

Chapter

Without assuming prior legal knowledge, books in the Directions series introduce and guide readers through key points of law and legal debate. It discusses European Convention law and relates it to domestic law under the HRA. Questions, discussion points and thinking points help readers to engage fully with each subject and check their understanding as they progress and knowledge can be tested by self-test questions and exam questions at the chapter end. This chapter considers the application of Convention rights in the field of prisoners’ rights; the impact of Convention rights on prisoners in the UK is considered. Prisoners remain within the protection of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR), though the application of these rights will take their position into account. Prisoners’ rights include not only rights to the non-arbitrary loss of liberty (Article 5) and rights to fair procedures (Article 5 and Article 6), but also not to be disproportionately denied the rights and freedoms in Articles 8 to 11. Imprisonment deprives individuals of their liberty and, therefore, is a public function for which the state is responsible under the Convention. The controversy over prisoners’ right to vote is discussed in Chapter 25.

Chapter

Without assuming prior legal knowledge, books in the Directions series introduce and guide readers through key points of law and legal debate. It discusses European Convention law and relates it to domestic law under the HRA. Questions, discussion points, and thinking points help readers to engage fully with each subject and check their understanding as they progress and knowledge can be tested by self-test questions and exam questions at the chapter end. This chapter considers the application of Convention rights in the field of prisoners’ rights; the impact of Convention rights on prisoners in the UK is considered. Prisoners remain within the protection of the European Convention on Human Rights, though the application of these rights will take their position into account. Prisoners’ rights include not only rights to the non-arbitrary loss of liberty (Article 5) and rights to fair procedures (Articles 5 and 6), but also not to be disproportionately denied the rights and freedoms in Articles 8–11. Imprisonment deprives individuals of their liberty and, therefore, is a public function for which the state is responsible under the Convention. The controversy over prisoners’ right to vote is discussed in Chapter 25.