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Chapter

This chapter, which examines the role of psychology in the criminal justice process, begins with a historical context before charting the development of some applications of psychology to criminal justice. It then discusses the application of psychology to all stages of the criminal justice process: pre-trial, trial, and post-trial. The chapter considers how psychology has influenced the law and its application, and the role psychologists play in criminal justice settings. It also highlights ways in which the law impacts upon psychological practice using examples of limitations to culpability, diversionary schemes, and the diagnosis of Dangerous and Severe Personality Disorder.

Chapter

This chapter examines the role of science in the criminal justice process, focusing on DNA profiling evidence, both as an important topic in its own right and as a case study illuminating broader issues. It considers the potent combination of scientific innovation and public policy making in the development of new forms of legally admissible evidence. The chapter explores some general, and fundamental, aspects of the logic of forensic proof in criminal trials.

Chapter

This chapter focuses on the magistrates’ courts. It discusses the importance of the magistracy and the work that they do; the involvement (and funding) of lawyers in summary justice; major pre-trial decisions such as bail and whether a case can be dealt with in the magistrates’ court or is so serious that it needs to be sent to the Crown court (mode of trial/allocation); how magistrates and their legal advisors measure up to the crime control/due process models of criminal justice; and the future of summary justice (including the impact of managerialist and ‘victim rights’ reforms and trends that encourage dealing with much lower court business away from the courtroom itself).

Chapter

This chapter focuses on the magistrates' courts. It discusses the importance of the magistracy; the involvement (and funding) of lawyers in summary justice; significant pre-trial decisions (including bail and mode of trial); how magistrates and their advisers measure up to the crime control/due process models of criminal justice; and the future of summary justice (including the impact of managerialist and ‘victim rights’ reforms).

Chapter

This chapter first considers the functions of the courts and questions whether there are other, more symbolic functions at play than finding the truth. It then outlines the court system, looking to both magistrates' courts and the Crown Court, and explores the composition of both courts, the types of cases that they deal with, and their role. To examine a particular decision made within the criminal courts, the chapter looks at the mode of trial decision. It concludes by asking whether the reality of the courts lives up to the rhetoric of trial by jury as the pinnacle of due process protections.