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Chapter

The Child Support Act 1991 introduced a mechanism to recover maintenance from absent parents for their children. It created the Child Support Agency (CSA) as the organization responsible for collecting child support maintenance. This chapter discusses the framework of child support; when a client may be required to pay child support; what a client can do if they do not receive child support; and the future of child support. It examines the CSA scheme, which commenced in 2003, and the Child Maintenance Service, which opened its doors on 29 July 2013. It also looks at the financial provisions under Schedule 1 of the Children Act 1989.

Chapter

This chapter discusses the main types of welfare benefits that are available to family law clients. It explains the importance of welfare benefits in relation to areas of family law, and that a family lawyer must have a working knowledge of these areas in particular with regards to financial remedy. The eligibility of benefits and what the client will receive is discussed. The chapter explains that the main benefit which is now in place is universal credit, but also mentions the ‘legacy benefits’, including income support, jobseeker’s allowance, tax credits, employment and support allowance, housing benefit, council tax reduction, and child benefit.