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Chapter

This chapter discusses the basic essentials of the law of administration. It addresses two central questions: Who administers the deceased’s estate? What does administration entail? It is the deceased’s personal representatives who administer the estate, either executors or administrators. Executors are the representatives appointed by the testator under his will (usually) to administer his estate. Administrators, on the other hand, are appointed by the court. This occurs where the deceased died intestate or, less frequently, where there was a will but no proving executor. The administration of the estate entails principally obtaining a grant of representation—a grant of probate in the case of a will, a grant of letters of administration in an intestacy—collecting and managing the assets of the estate, paying the debts and liabilities, and distributing the net estate according to the testator’s will or the rules of intestacy.

Chapter

This chapter discusses the basic essentials of the law of administration. It addresses two central questions: Who administers the deceased's estate? What does administration entail? It is the deceased's personal representatives who administer the estate, either executors or administrators. Executors are the representatives appointed by the testator under his will (usually) to administer his estate. Administrators, on the other hand, are appointed by the court. This occurs where the deceased died intestate or, less frequently, where there was a will but no proving executor. The administration of the estate entails principally obtaining a grant of representation — a grant of probate in the case of a will, a grant of letters of administration in an intestacy — collecting and managing the assets of the estate, paying the debts and liabilities, and distributing the net estate according to the testator's will or the rules of intestacy.

Chapter

This chapter examines the natures of trustees’ duties and power related to the administration of trusts. It considers the sources of these duties and powers, the function of the trust instrument in the interpretation of these duties and powers, and the issue of breach of trust. It describes the trustees’ power to compound liabilities, to settle claims and accumulate income. This chapter also discusses some of the main duties of trustees which include the duty of care, the duty to safeguard the trust property, and the duty to maintain a fair balance between the beneficiaries. The duty to invest property is considered in some detail, with particular reference to the need to manage risk through a diverse portfolio and consideration of whether ethical considerations can be taken into account when selecting investments.

Chapter

This chapter examines the natures of trustees’ duties and power related to the administration of trusts. It considers the sources of these duties and powers, the function of the trust instrument in the interpretation of these duties and powers, and the issue of breach of trust. It describes the trustees’ power to compound liabilities, to settle claims and accumulate income. This chapter also discusses some of the main duties of trustees which include the duty of care, the duty to safeguard the trust property, and the duty to maintain a fair balance between the beneficiaries. The duty to invest property is considered in some detail, with particular reference to the need to manage risk through a diverse portfolio and consideration of whether ethical considerations can be taken into account when selecting investments.

Chapter

The Concentrate Questions and Answers series offer the best preparation for tackling exam questions. Each book includes typical questions, bullet-pointed answer plans, suggested answers and author commentary. This book offers advice on what to expect in exams and how best to prepare. This chapter covers questions on administration of trusts.

Chapter

Paul S Davies and Graham Virgo

All books in this flagship series contain carefully selected substantial extracts from key cases, legislation, and academic debate, providing able students with a stand-alone resource. This chapter elaborates on the issues regarding the administration of a trust and its relation to the trustees. Trustees are responsible for the administration of the trust and are subject to certain duties and have a number of powers relating to trust administration. To assist with the administration of the trust, trustees have the option, collectively and individually, to delegate certain functions to others. They are required to perform their administrative responsibilities diligently, and are subject to a duty to comply with the standard of skill and care expected of all trustees. Trustees have a duty to act in the interests of all the beneficiaries, maintaining a fair balance between them. They are also responsible for safeguarding the trust assets for the benefit of all beneficiaries, and, as such, have a duty to invest trust assets in the best interests of present and future beneficiaries.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Equity & Trusts provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in AIB Group (UK) Plc v Mark Redler & Co Solicitors [2014] UKSC 58, Supreme Court. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Derek Whayman.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Equity & Trusts provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in AIB Group (UK) Plc v Mark Redler & Co Solicitors [2014] UKSC 58, Supreme Court. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Derek Whayman.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Equity & Trusts provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in AIB Group (UK) Plc v Mark Redler & Co Solicitors [2014] UKSC 58, Supreme Court. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Derek Whayman.

Chapter

This chapter is concerned with the various ways in which succession to property may occur on death, other than by intestacy or by a will executed under s. 9 of the Wills Act 1837. The subject-matter can be divided for the purposes of exposition broadly into two categories: alternative wills, and alternative entitlement. Alternative wills include privileged wills and statutory wills. Alternative entitlement includes nominations, donatio mortis causa, constructive trusts, and proprietary estoppel. Many of the alternative succession mechanisms considered in the chapter are potentially difficult. Most of them are by definition exceptions to the formality requirements considered in Chapter 5. That said, most mechanisms of ‘alternative’ succession have a clear rationale and are appropriately contained.

Chapter

This chapter is concerned with the various ways in which succession to property may occur on death, other than by intestacy or by a will executed under s. 9 of the Wills Act 1837. The subject matter can be divided for the purposes of exposition broadly into two categories: alternative wills, and alternative entitlement. Alternative wills include privileged wills and statutory wills. Alternative entitlement includes nominations, donatio mortis causa, constructive trusts, and proprietary estoppel. Many of the alternative succession mechanisms considered in the chapter are potentially difficult. Most of them are by definition exceptions to the formality requirements considered in Chapter 5. That said, most mechanisms of ‘alternative’ succession have a clear rationale and are appropriately contained.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Equity & Trusts provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision American Cyanamid Co v Ethicon Ltd (No 1) [1975] AC 396, House of Lords. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Derek Whayman.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Equity & Trusts provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision American Cyanamid Co v Ethicon Ltd (No 1) [1975] AC 396, House of Lords. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Derek Whayman.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Equity & Trusts provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision American Cyanamid Co v Ethicon Ltd (No 1) [1975] AC 396, House of Lords. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Derek Whayman.

Chapter

Celebrated for their conceptual clarity, titles in the Clarendon Law Series offer concise, accessible overviews of major fields of law and legal thought. This chapter considers Equity's special techniques for safeguarding property interests. Property's primary protection comes from rules that enable disputing parties to resolve title conflicts and priority disputes. Absolute justice is unlikely; the law must simply decide who has the stronger claim. Property's secondary protection is more controversial. Equity's tracing and claiming strategies allow claimants to assert new proprietary rights in substitute assets. These rights preserve the insolvency priority of the initial proprietary claim or secure entitlements to windfall secondary profits. Neither of these options follows inevitably from the initial assertion of a proprietary right.

Chapter

This chapter discusses the role of trustees, which is central to the operation of trusts. In most cases, trustees have extensive powers conferred upon them by the trust instrument or by the general law. The way in which they exercise those powers can have a huge impact upon whether or not the objectives of the trust are achieved, and upon the beneficiaries. Choosing the right trustees is, therefore, essential. This chapter thus looks at how the original trustees are appointed and what steps can be taken should the trustees need to be changed through resignation or retirement, or because the settlor or the beneficiaries are no longer content that a trustee should continue in office.

Chapter

Titles in the Complete series combine extracts from a wide range of primary materials with clear explanatory text to provide readers with a complete introductory resource. This chapter discusses the following: the different types of trustee; the number of trustees required; the general duties of trustees; trustee decision making; disclaiming trusteeship; who is eligible to be a trustee; who has power to appoint trustees, express and statutory powers; the appointment of trustees by the beneficiaries; the appointment of trustees by the court; the vesting of the legal estate in the trustees; the retirement of trustees; and the removal of trustees; protection of beneficiaries.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Equity & Trusts provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Armitage v Nurse [1998] Ch 241, Court of Appeal. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Derek Whayman.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Equity & Trusts provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Armitage v Nurse [1998] Ch 241, Court of Appeal. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Derek Whayman.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Equity & Trusts provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Armitage v Nurse [1998] Ch 241, Court of Appeal. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Derek Whayman.