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Chapter

This chapter discusses active case management and the use of sanctions. The Woolf reforms and more recently the Jackson reforms have supported the concept of active case management, the focus of which is to ensure that cases are dealt with ‘justly’ and ‘at proportionate cost’. The objectives of case management are set out in Civil Procedure Rules (CPR) Part 1 and the courts case management powers are in CPR Part 3. The powers of the court in relation to case management are wide and directions given after the issue of proceedings should provide a framework and timetable for dealing with a case right up to trial. The final section of the chapter deals with the sanctions that might be imposed where there is a failure to comply with case management requirements.

Chapter

This chapter discusses the rules for additional claims under Part 20 of the Civil Procedure Rules 1998 (CPR). An additional claim typically will seek to pass any liability established against the defendant to a third party. This is achieved by seeking indemnities, contributions, or related remedies against the third party. A third party may in turn seek to pass on its liability to a fourth party, and so on. Permission to issue an additional claim is not required if the additional claim is issued before or at the same time as the defendant files its defence. An additional claim operates as a separate claim within the original claim.

Chapter

This chapter discusses the rules for additional claims under Part 20 of the Civil Procedure Rules 1998 (CPR). An additional claim typically will seek to pass any liability established against the defendant to a third party. This is achieved by seeking indemnities, contributions, or related remedies against the third party. A third party may in turn seek to pass on its liability to a fourth party, and so on. Permission to issue an additional claim is not required if the additional claim is issued before or at the same time as the defendant files its defence. An additional claim operates as a separate claim within the original claim.

Chapter

This chapter discusses the rules for additional claims under Part 20 of the Civil Procedure Rules 1998 (CPR). An additional claim typically will seek to pass any liability established against the defendant to a third party. This is achieved by seeking indemnities, contributions, or related remedies against the third party. A third party may in turn seek to pass on its liability to a fourth party, and so on. Permission to issue an additional claim is not required if the additional claim is issued before or at the same time as the defendant files its defence. An additional claim operates as a separate claim within the original claim.

Chapter

This chapter discusses the rules relating to the proof of admissions and documents at trial. It covers the nature of admissions; pre-action admissions of liability; permission to withdraw an admission; notice to admit facts; and proving documents.

Chapter

This chapter discusses the rules relating to the proof of admissions and documents at trial. It covers the nature of admissions; pre-action admissions of liability; permission to withdraw an admission; notice to admit facts; and proving documents.

Chapter

This chapter discusses the rules relating to the proof of admissions and documents at trial. It covers the nature of admissions; pre-action admissions of liability; permission to withdraw an admission; notice to admit facts; and proving documents.

Chapter

In recent years alternative dispute resolution (ADR) has evolved from being a fallback in relation to litigation into an important alternative that may be the preferred option in some cases. This chapter outlines the interface between litigation and ADR, and puts litigation into the context of settlement options. ADR is only a complete alternative to litigation where a full adjudicative option such as arbitration or expert determination is used. In most disputes it is more likely that a case will move between litigation and ADR processes, or be subject to both at the same time where an offer has been made and remains open, but the litigation process continues. The chapter discusses the main types of ADR and their fit with litigation; framing an attempt to settle; drawing up terms of settlement; and making Part 36 offers, especially when costs are a major concern in litigation.

Chapter

Advocacy involves the presentation to a judge of two competing versions of the facts, of the law, or both. This chapter discusses the skills of solicitor advocacy. It focuses on identifying key principles of the ethics of advocacy; understanding the structure of a case presented for trial; developing a case presentation strategy incorporating the client’s goals; making an effective submission; and planning an examination-in-chief and cross-examination using appropriate questions.

Chapter

Alternative dispute resolution (ADR), particularly mediation, plays a key role in reducing the costs of civil disputes by fomenting the early settlement of cases. This chapter discusses ADR processes; advantages or disadvantages of ADR and litigation; the cost of ADR; reference to ADR; and court involvement in ADR. Adjudicative ADR results in the third party neutral deciding the dispute or difference between the parties. Non-adjudicative ADR processes involve moving the parties towards reaching a compromise agreement between themselves. Rules of court require parties to consider using ADR. Sanctions may be imposed on parties who act unreasonably.

Chapter

This chapter deals with the methods by which the Civil Procedure Rules (CPR) encourage parties to settle their disputes at an early stage and, ultimately, without proceeding trial. It also looks at the methods of dispute resolution that may be available. The chapter includes a detailed look at the most common dispute resolution methods. Further, it covers the different types of alternative dispute resolution (ADR); the integration of ADR into the CPR; the philosophy of ADR; and a detailed look at mediation.

Chapter

This chapter deals with the methods by which the Civil Procedure Rules (CPR) encourage parties to settle their disputes at an early stage and, ultimately, without proceeding to trial. It also looks at the methods of dispute resolution that may be available. The chapter includes a detailed look at the most common dispute resolution methods. Further, it covers the different types of alternative dispute resolution (ADR); the integration of ADR into the CPR; the philosophy of ADR; and a detailed look at mediation.

Chapter

Alternative dispute resolution (ADR), particularly mediation, plays a key role in reducing the costs of civil disputes by fomenting the early settlement of cases. This chapter discusses ADR processes; advantages or disadvantages of ADR and litigation; the cost of ADR; reference to ADR; and court involvement in ADR. Adjudicative ADR results in the third party neutral deciding the dispute or difference between the parties. Non-adjudicative ADR processes involve moving the parties towards reaching a compromise agreement between themselves. Rules of court require parties to consider using ADR. Sanctions may be imposed on parties who act unreasonably.

Chapter

This chapter deals with the methods by which the Civil Procedure Rules (CPR) encourage parties to settle their disputes at an early stage and, ultimately, without proceeding trial. It also looks at the methods of dispute resolution that may be available. The chapter includes a detailed look at the most common dispute resolution methods. Further, it covers the different types of alternative dispute resolution (ADR); the integration of ADR into the CPR; the philosophy of ADR; and a detailed look at mediation.

Chapter

Alternative dispute resolution (ADR), particularly mediation, plays a key role in reducing the costs of civil disputes by fomenting the early settlement of cases. This chapter discusses ADR processes; advantages or disadvantages of ADR and litigation; the cost of ADR; reference to ADR; and court involvement in ADR. Adjudicative ADR results in the third party neutral deciding the dispute or difference between the parties. Non-adjudicative ADR processes involve moving the parties towards reaching a compromise agreement between themselves. Rules of court require parties to consider using ADR. Sanctions may be imposed on parties who act unreasonably.

Chapter

This chapter first discusses the methods by which a family lawyer may resolve family law disputes, including alternative dispute resolution (ADR). It then reviews the various forms of negotiation that a family lawyer may undertake. These include settlement between clients, negotiation through correspondence, meeting between counsel, and at-court negotiation. Next, the chapter discusses mediation and collaborative law as different forms of ADR used in family law. It outlines MIAMs (mediation information and assessment meetings) and their importance prior to issuing proceedings. It also discusses the various steps of collaborative law. It also briefly considers a recent development in family ADR: arbitration.

Chapter

This chapter first discusses the methods by which a family lawyer may resolve family law disputes, including alternative dispute resolution (ADR). It then reviews the various forms of negotiation that a family lawyer may undertake. These include settlement between clients, negotiation through correspondence, meeting between counsel, and at-court negotiation. Next, the chapter discusses mediation and collaborative law as different forms of ADR used in family law. It outlines MIAMs (mediation information and assessment meetings) and their importance prior to issuing proceedings. It also discusses the various steps of collaborative law. It also briefly considers a recent development in family ADR: arbitration.

Chapter

This chapter first discusses the methods by which a family lawyer may resolve family law disputes, including Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR). It then reviews the various forms of negotiation that a family lawyer may undertake. These include settlement between clients, negotiation through correspondence, meeting between counsel, and at-court negotiation. Next, the chapter discusses mediation and collaborative law as different forms of ADR used in family law. It also briefly considers a recent development in family ADR: arbitration.

Chapter

Changes in the parties’ knowledge of a case as it progresses and straightforward drafting errors make it necessary on occasion to make amendments to the statements of case. This chapter discusses amendment by consent; amendment without permission; principles governing permission to amend; amendment after the expiry of the limitation period; and procedure on amending.

Chapter

Changes in the parties’ knowledge of a case as it progresses and straightforward drafting errors make it necessary on occasion to make amendments to the statements of case. This chapter discusses amendment by consent; amendment without permission; principles governing permission to amend; amendment after the expiry of the limitation period; and procedure on amending.