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A Practical Approach to Alternative Dispute Resolution

A Practical Approach to Alternative Dispute Resolution (5th edn)

Susan Blake, Julie Browne, and Stuart Sime
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date: 25 April 2024

p. 735. Online ADR Options and ODRlocked

p. 735. Online ADR Options and ODRlocked

  • Susan Blake, Susan BlakeProfessor, Barrister and Associate Dean of Education, The City Law School, City, University of Londona
  • Julie BrowneJulie BrowneAssociate Professor, Barrister and Deputy Course Director of the BPTC, The City Law School, City, University of London
  •  and Stuart SimeStuart SimeProfessor, Barrister and Course Director of the BPTC, The City Law School, City, University of London

Abstract

This chapter examines online alternative dispute resolution (ADR) options and online dispute resolution (ODR) options. The use of information and communication technology (ICT) in relation to all forms of dispute resolution is a major area of current development. In saving time and money in resolving disputes, ICT has much to offer, especially in relation to lower-value cases, and this is seen in the growing use of online portals and software-based support for dispute resolution. Indeed, software is already used successfully to mimic some negotiation and mediation processes, and this is likely to develop further. ODR comprises systems designed to work online that do not necessarily fit within existing ADR definitions. International and cross-border ODR is now being developed, especially to support e-commerce and deal with lower-value disputes.

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