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A Practical Approach to Alternative Dispute Resolution

A Practical Approach to Alternative Dispute Resolution (5th edn)

Susan Blake, Julie Browne, and Stuart Sime
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date: 25 April 2024

p. 53132. Enforcement of Settlements and Awardslocked

p. 53132. Enforcement of Settlements and Awardslocked

  • Susan Blake, Susan BlakeProfessor, Barrister and Associate Dean of Education, The City Law School, City, University of Londona
  • Julie BrowneJulie BrowneAssociate Professor, Barrister and Deputy Course Director of the BPTC, The City Law School, City, University of London
  •  and Stuart SimeStuart SimeProfessor, Barrister and Course Director of the BPTC, The City Law School, City, University of London

Abstract

This chapter focuses on the enforcement of settlements and awards. The approach taken to enforcement of compromises in large measure depends on the nature of the process used to resolve the original dispute. In adjudicative procedures, enforcement will often be through registering the award with the courts of the state where enforcement is to take place, and then enforcing the award as a civil judgment. An exception is construction industry adjudications, where the decision is not itself registrable. Instead, it may be enforced through bringing court proceedings and entering judgment. In non-adjudicative procedures, if the parties have resolved their dispute, they will have entered into a contract of compromise. Enforcement is through suing on that contract. Alternatively, in a non-adjudicative procedure, the parties may convert the compromise agreement into a court judgment or order, and then enforce that judgment or order.

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