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A Practical Approach to Alternative Dispute Resolution

A Practical Approach to Alternative Dispute Resolution (5th edn)

Susan Blake, Julie Browne, and Stuart Sime
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date: 23 February 2024

p. 50931. High Court Jurisdiction in Arbitration Claimslocked

p. 50931. High Court Jurisdiction in Arbitration Claimslocked

  • Susan Blake, Susan BlakeProfessor, Barrister and Associate Dean of Education, The City Law School, City, University of Londona
  • Julie BrowneJulie BrowneAssociate Professor, Barrister and Deputy Course Director of the BPTC, The City Law School, City, University of London
  •  and Stuart SimeStuart SimeProfessor, Barrister and Course Director of the BPTC, The City Law School, City, University of London

Abstract

This chapter addresses High Court jurisdiction in arbitration claims. Intervention by the courts in arbitrations is restricted to those situations allowed by the Arbitration Act 1996. These include situations where the judicial system can offer support to the arbitral process to make it effective and to correct obvious injustices. Applications in support of the arbitral process include applications relating to the appointment of arbitrators and procedural orders to secure evidence for use in arbitrations. Ultimately, judicial review of arbitral awards is strictly restricted. The main provisions deal with serious irregularities and appeals on points of law. Appeals to the Court of Appeal are (with minor exceptions) only available with the permission of the High Court judge.

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