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A Practical Approach to Alternative Dispute Resolution

A Practical Approach to Alternative Dispute Resolution (5th edn)

Susan Blake, Julie Browne, and Stuart Sime
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date: 23 February 2024

p. 40725. Construction Industry Adjudicationlocked

p. 40725. Construction Industry Adjudicationlocked

  • Susan Blake, Susan BlakeProfessor, Barrister and Associate Dean of Education, The City Law School, City, University of Londona
  • Julie BrowneJulie BrowneAssociate Professor, Barrister and Deputy Course Director of the BPTC, The City Law School, City, University of London
  •  and Stuart SimeStuart SimeProfessor, Barrister and Course Director of the BPTC, The City Law School, City, University of London

Abstract

This chapter looks at the process of adjudication in construction industry disputes. Adjudication resembles arbitration, in that it produces a decision on the dispute, but one that is only of a temporary nature. The process involves an adjudicator reaching a decision very swiftly (only 28 days after appointment), with the idea being to get a decision on how much a contractor should be paid, potentially followed by a full-blown investigation through the courts or in a formal arbitration if either party does not agree with the adjudicator's decision. The underlying policy is ‘pay now, argue later’. An adjudication award is binding, but is not registrable as a judgment, unlike an award in arbitration. Instead, enforcement is through suing on the adjudicator's decision, often followed by the entry of judgment in default or an application for summary judgment.

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