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A Practical Approach to Alternative Dispute Resolution

A Practical Approach to Alternative Dispute Resolution (5th edn)

Susan Blake, Julie Browne, and Stuart Sime
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date: 21 April 2024

p. 39124. Expert or Neutral Determinationlocked

p. 39124. Expert or Neutral Determinationlocked

  • Susan Blake, Susan BlakeProfessor, Barrister and Associate Dean of Education, The City Law School, City, University of Londona
  • Julie BrowneJulie BrowneAssociate Professor, Barrister and Deputy Course Director of the BPTC, The City Law School, City, University of London
  •  and Stuart SimeStuart SimeProfessor, Barrister and Course Director of the BPTC, The City Law School, City, University of London

Abstract

This chapter studies expert or neutral determination. Expert determination differs from early neutral or expert evaluation because the parties will appoint an expert to make a decision or formal determination on the issues referred to the expert. The expert can only make a decision within the boundaries laid down by the parties. In this sense, expert determination is a determinative process, rather than a facilitative process (mediation) or an advisory evaluative process (neutral evaluation). Expert determination differs from evaluation because the expert is asked to do more than produce a non-binding evaluation, opinion, or recommendation in relation to the issues in dispute, but rather to determine those issues. The decision is usually final and binding on the parties, and it can only be challenged in court proceedings in very limited circumstances.

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