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A Practical Approach to Alternative Dispute Resolution

A Practical Approach to Alternative Dispute Resolution (5th edn)

Susan Blake, Julie Browne, and Stuart Sime
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date: 25 April 2024

p. 20113. The Negotiation Processlocked

p. 20113. The Negotiation Processlocked

  • Susan Blake, Susan BlakeProfessor, Barrister and Associate Dean of Education, The City Law School, City, University of Londona
  • Julie BrowneJulie BrowneAssociate Professor, Barrister and Deputy Course Director of the BPTC, The City Law School, City, University of London
  •  and Stuart SimeStuart SimeProfessor, Barrister and Course Director of the BPTC, The City Law School, City, University of London

Abstract

This chapter explores the negotiation process. Good communication skills are very important for effective negotiation. Each negotiator should make clear any limits on authority, and whether any settlement will be subject to client approval. Indeed, agenda setting and opening are important in gaining control of a negotiation. It is normal to move through each issue reasonably systematically, making best use of information, analysis, and presentation. It is also important to deal with concessions, offers, and demands effectively to get the best outcome for the client. The negotiator should be able to identify the problems that can arise in a negotiation process and the techniques that may be used to overcome them. If a negotiation is successful, an oral contract is reached; the terms should then be clarified and recorded. Even if the negotiation is not successful, progress may be made with regard to the case.

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