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The Modern Law of Evidence

The Modern Law of Evidence (14th edn)

Adrian Keane and Paul McKeown
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date: 21 April 2024

p. 2358. Cross-examination and re-examinationlocked

p. 2358. Cross-examination and re-examinationlocked

  • Adrian KeaneAdrian Keaneof the Inner Temple, Barrister, Emeritus Professor of Law, The City Law School, City, University of London, Former Dean of the Inns of Court School of Law
  •  and Paul McKeownPaul McKeownof Lincoln’s Inn, Barrister, Associate Professor of Law, The City Law School, City, University of London

Abstract

This chapter first discusses cross-examination, the questioning of a witness immediately after his examination-in-chief by the legal representative of the opponent of the party calling him, or by the opposing party in person, and by the legal representative of any other party to the proceedings or by any other party in person. The object of cross-examination is to elicit evidence which supports the cross-examining party’s version of the facts in issue and to cast doubt upon the witness’s evidence-in-chief. It then turns to re-examination. A witness who has been cross-examined may be re-examined by the party who called him. The object of re-examination is to repair damage that has been done by cross-examination.

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